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In which way should I access this parent method and parent variable?

class Base
{
public:
    std::string mWords;
    Base() { mWords = "blahblahblah" }
};

class Foundation
{
public:
    Write( std::string text )
    {
        std::cout << text;
    }
};

class Child : public Base, public Foundation
{
    DoSomething()
    {
        this->Write( this->mWords );
        // or
        Foundation::Write( Base::mWords );
    }
};

Thanks.

Edit: And what if there is ambiguity?

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The two syntaxes you use in your code (this->... and qualified names) are only necessary specifically when there is ambiguity or some other name lookup issue, like name hiding, template base class etc.

When there's no ambiguity or other problems you don't need any of these syntaxes. All you need is a simple unqualified name, like Write in your example. Just Write, not this->Write and not Foundation::Write. The same applies to mWords.

I.e. in your specific example a plain Write( mWords ) will work just fine.


To illustrate the above, if your DoSomething method had mWords parameter, as in

DoSomething(int mWords) {
  ...

then this local mWords parameter would hide inherited class member mWords and you'd have to use either

DoSomething(int mWords) {
  Write(this->mWords);
}

or

DoSomething(int mWords) {
  Write(Foundation::mWords);
}

to express your intent properly, i.e. to break through the hiding.


If your Child class also had its own mWords member, as in

class Child : public Base, public Foundation
{
  int mWords
  ...

then this name would hide the inherited mWords. The this->mWords approach in this case would not help you to unhide the proper name, and you'd have to use the qualified name to solve the problem

DoSomething(int mWords) {
  Write(Foundation::mWords);
}

If both of your base classes had an mWords member, as in

class Base {
public:
  std::string mWords;
  ...
};

class Foundation {
public:
  int mWords;
  ...

then in Child::DoSomething the mWords name would be ambiguous, and you'd have to do

DoSomething(int mWords) {
  Write(Foundation::mWords);
}

to resolve the ambiguity.


But, again, in your specific example, where there's no ambiguity and no name hiding all this is completely unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
    
makes sense. thanks! – user542687 Dec 24 '10 at 2:45

Since there is no naming conflict, simply use Write(mWords). Use the other 2 if you have local variables that conflict, or when the names are hidden.

share|improve this answer
    
If there is conflict, which method do you recommend I use? – user542687 Dec 24 '10 at 1:01
    
and what do you mean by "when the names are hidden"? – user542687 Dec 24 '10 at 1:01
    
if it's a conflict between local variables and member variables (e.g. your class has a member variable i, and your method also uses a local variable i), use this. if A declares a function f, and B inherits A and declares f also, and you want to call A's f from B, then use A::f. – lijie Dec 24 '10 at 5:24

I think this is the most common approach:

Write(mWords);

unless you run into ambiguity.

If there's ambiguity or shadowing because you want something in a (particular) base class but something in another base class (or this class) hides it, then use the Base::name syntax.

If a local variable is shadowing one of your members, then use this->, though in general you should try to avoid this situation. (ie: try to avoid naming locals such that they shadow members)

I suppose one way to look at it would be to use the first of these that works and does what you want:

  1. name
  2. this->name
  3. Base::name
share|improve this answer
    
yes, I might have to deal with ambiguity... I will clarify in my original post. – user542687 Dec 24 '10 at 0:57

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