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In choosing an editor for my wiki-like site, I'm debating whether to allow HTML or a custom alternate markup (maybe like wikipedia/wikimedia's or BBCode).

HTML benefits:

  • Easy for users to deal with (copying and pasting, learning)
  • Somewhat future proof
  • Many more editing tools available, usually WYSIWYG too

Alternate markup benefits:

  • On the server side I don't have to worry about parsing malicious javascript or styles or HTML that I don't allow
  • Can be easy to learn
  • Can be easier to decipher if not HTML-savvy

Am I missing something, what's the best solution?

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4 Answers 4

Depends on your target audience. If they're tech savvy, they probably know HTML, BBCode, etc. If they're not, they probably don't and a simplified markup might be more appropriate. Personally I like markdown for the non-tech savvy. There are editing tools available for both, also libraries available for handling each of them. So really it comes down to which do you want your users to use?

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I would stick with wiki markup. You can make it easier by using a WYSIWYG editor like FCKEditor

For HTML, let moderators have control using e.g. Extension:RawMsg

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Peroanlly as a user, I'm not a fan of html for things like wiki editing. Most of the time you dont need more than simple features so its too verbose and just makes life harder, and I dont really like using WYSIWYG editors either. I prefer being able to type Markdown or Textile myself directly into the editing field.

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If ease of use is a concern, go with a WYSIWYG editor, and then it doesn't really matter what the underlying markup is.

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