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In my multi-threaded project(C# 3.5), I have many codes simliar to this:

    Map map;
    lock ( _maps )
    {
        map = _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID );
    }

It looks ugly to me. Takes too many lines for simple retrieval...

What I want is one line code as simple as this:

    Map map = _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID );

But with lock: (not working)

    Map map = lock( _maps ){ _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID ) };

    Map map = delegate(){ lock( _maps ) return _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID ) };

Any help will be greatly appreciated :) Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Your second try with the delegate is close to working, just needs to be: Map map = new Func<Map>(delegate { lock(_maps) return _maps.First(i => i.ID == arg.MapID); })(); As it is it just creates an anonymous method and tries to assign it to the variable map. You need to do something to invoke it. But I'm not posting this as an answer, because I think the extension method w/ Func<T> looks better. –  Paul Wheeler Dec 24 '10 at 5:56
    
Thanks :) :) I couldn't pull that off.. Thanks again! –  wooohoh Dec 24 '10 at 6:06
    
I understand that I need to declare anonymous method and invoke it. But "Func<Map>(delegate { lock(_maps) return _maps.First(i => i.ID == arg.MapID); })();" does not compile. –  wooohoh Dec 24 '10 at 6:19

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Better yet, just make an extension method on Object instead of IEnumerable<T>:

public static T LockAndExecute<T>(this Object obj, Func<T> operation)
{
    lock(obj)
    {
        return operation();
    }
}

That way not only is your case elegant

Map map = _maps.LockAndExecute(() =>  _maps.First(i => i.ID == arg.MapID);

but you can reuse this regardless of what you're doing within the lock.

share|improve this answer
    
THANK YOU!! This one's my favorite! –  wooohoh Dec 24 '10 at 5:52
4  
It's generally considered bad form to put an extension method on Object because that pollutes the Intellisense for everything and can't be used in VB. –  Gabe Dec 24 '10 at 6:21
    
It's true, this definitely violates several best practices (see blogs.msdn.com/b/vbteam/archive/2007/03/10/…). However, I'm of the "whatever works" persuasion, and so long as you're not shipping public extension methods for other developers to consume, and you give your method a likely to be unique name, there's not really a lot of downside here. –  Paul Wheeler Dec 26 '10 at 2:35
public T Lock<T>(object o, Func<T> f) {
    lock (o) {
        return f();
    }
}

...

Map map = Lock(_maps, () => _maps.First(i => i.ID == arg.MapID));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I said 'ah' on this! I want to choose this my answer as well.. but pity, I can't choose two answers. –  wooohoh Dec 24 '10 at 5:54
    
Your method isn't static so your example won't work. –  Gabe Dec 24 '10 at 6:21

If you think it looks better on one line,

Map map; lock( _maps ){ map = _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID ) }; 

is only another 4 characters to what you've tried. But it's the same as what you currently have, just on one line.

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1  
LOL...(15 characters) –  Danny Chen Dec 24 '10 at 5:39
    
it's what I did initially :) –  wooohoh Dec 24 '10 at 5:57

you can use an extension method...

public static TResult Lock<T, TResult>(this T arg, 
     Func<T, TResult> callback) where T : class
{
    if(arg == null) throw new ArgumentNullException();

    lock(arg)
    {
        return callback(arg);
    }
}

and you can use it like this

Map map = maps.Lock(x => x.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID ));
share|improve this answer

With a function like this:

static class WithLock
{
    public static T Execute<T>(object o, Func<T> action)
    {
        lock (o)
        {
            return action();
        }
    }
}

you can do something like this:

Map map = WithLock.Execute(_maps, () => _maps.First( i => i.ID == arg.MapID ));
share|improve this answer

Ugly? I don't think so. Maybe you can use this instead, they are totally the same.

Monitor.Enter(obj);
try
{
   //do something
}
finally
{
   Monitor.Exit(obj);
}

But I prefer the lock statement, because {} provides a clearer scope.

lock(obj)
{
   //body of the lock statement
}//end of the lock scope

It's much more clearer, isn't it? why do you feel it ugly?

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First, how is this an answer? Second, I believe a lock statement is closer to: Monitor.Enter(obj); try { /* do something */ } finally { Monitor.Exit(obj); } –  Paul Wheeler Dec 24 '10 at 5:59
    
@Paul Wheeler: Thanks for your prompt, my carelessness. And by the way, I don't think oppugnning OP's question is wrong. Extension methods are overused in this question. –  Danny Chen Dec 24 '10 at 6:07
    
And actually that is no longer the codegen for the lock statement. We now codegen the enter inside the try. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… for details. –  Eric Lippert Dec 24 '10 at 6:21
    
@Eric Lippert: Thanks for your nice link. And now I even don't know how to modify this answer, since as you said in your blog, It (the lock statement) is "consistently bad" :( –  Danny Chen Dec 24 '10 at 6:29

try something simple without extension methods

private static readonly object lockObj = new object();
private static T LockAndExecute<T>(Func<T> func)
{
    lock (lockObj)
        return func();
}

Map map = LockAndExecute(() => _maps.First(i => i.ID == arg.MapID));
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I don't really like any of the options that are provided in the other answers. The proposed methods rely on the caller understanding the internals of the methods, and the call-site complexity is way too high for what the methods are intending to do. Both of these are major code smells.

Instead, why not just create the obvious method at the correct level of abstraction? Then your code will go down to one simple line where it counts.

private Map GetMapById(int id)
{
    lock (_maps)
    {
        return _maps.First( i => i.ID == id );
    }
}

....    

Map map = GetMapById(arg.MapID);
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