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See the following:

   for (int i=0; i<2; i++) {
        // do some stuff
        r = new Random((int)DateTime.Now.Ticks);
        iRandom = r.Next(30000);
        // do some other stuff
   }

Don't ask me how, but iRandom is sometimes the same for both iterations of the loop. I need iRandom to be different for each iteration. How do I do this?

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What might be happening is each step executes so fast that the next Random instance gets seeded with the same value. Have you tried calling the Random() constructor with no arguments (it may give you a better time value for your seed)? –  Rafe Kettler Dec 24 '10 at 5:32
    
I'm assuming that is what's happening. It is surprising however because I thought Ticks was measured in nanoseconds. –  Craig Johnston Dec 24 '10 at 5:34
    
dunno, I know nothing about .NET so I could be wrong –  Rafe Kettler Dec 24 '10 at 5:36
4  
Beeing measured in nanoseconds (btw it is hundreds of nanoseconds - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.ticks.aspx) does not mean it changes every hundred nanoseconds. DateTime precision is 10ms ( msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.now.aspx) which is pretty much forever for any simple program. As result all your calls to .Ticks return the same value. –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 24 '10 at 5:49

6 Answers 6

Change your loop to this:

    r = new Random((int)DateTime.Now.Ticks);

   for (int i=0; i<2; i++) {
    // do some stuff
    iRandom = r.Next(30000);
    // do some other stuff
   }

In other words, put the creation of the Random object outside the loop.

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If the seed is Ticks, why would this be necessary? –  Craig Johnston Dec 24 '10 at 5:32
1  
+1, it shouldn't be necessary to generate a new instance of Random each time a random value is desired. –  Rafe Kettler Dec 24 '10 at 5:33
    
If the proper way to generate the next random number is using .Next(), I wouldn't trust anything else to be completely reliable. –  Flipster Dec 24 '10 at 5:45
1  
@Craig: The RNG is indeed seeded using the system clock if you use its parameterless constructor (or, I suppose, using the Ticks value the way you've coded it here), but you're creating the new objects in extremely rapid succession, which is causing them to be seeded with the same value. Your for loop runs much faster than you think! –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 5:49
    
The suggestion is to make the code efficient but not an answer for why iRandom is same for both iterations. –  Chandu Dec 24 '10 at 5:50

try creating your Random with a non time-based seed, otherwise the seed may be the same (and the random number same also)

for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
{
    // do some stuff
    r = new Random(Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode());
    iRandom = r.Next(30000);
    // do some other stuff
}
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For some surprises with Math.Random doubles versus RNGCryptoServiceProvider, try plotting the results of the following (say, using a spreadsheet). This code will run in LinqPad (www.LinqPad.net). It's worth a look :)

void Main()
{
{
    var ds = Enumerable.Range(1, 30).Select(i => new Random(i).NextDouble());
    ds.Dump();
}
{
    var csp = new System.Security.Cryptography.RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
    var bs = new byte[8 * 30];
    var ds = new double[30];
    csp.GetBytes(bs);

    for (var i = 0; i < 30; i++)
    {
        var d = BitConverter.ToDouble(bs, i * 8);
        while (d == 0D || Double.IsNaN(d))
        {
            var bytes = new byte[8];
            csp.GetBytes(bytes);
            d = BitConverter.ToDouble(bs, 0);
        }
        ds[i] = Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d));
    }

    ds.Dump();
}

}

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I can't handle the anticipation: what's the surprise? –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 7:16
    
@Cody: The Math.Random one shows a very interesting non-random structure :) Of course, it's not advertised as a cryptographically sound PRNG, so there's no grounds for outrage. Still, it's mildly surprising that there is so much regularity so near the surface. –  Reb.Cabin Dec 24 '10 at 16:18
    
What, specifically, do you mean by "non-random"? There are a lot of definitions to the word "random" floating around, some of them mathematically rigorous and others more colloquial. Of course it's not designed for cryptography (there are other functions for that), but there is definitely a chance for regularity to true randomness. –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 16:22
    
@Cody: Informally, if I plot a sequence of numbers and see a "visually obvious" or "crystalline" structure (double quotes denoting informal usage of the words), such as a sawtooth or a sine wave or something that I could easily model off-the-cuff with little combinations of polynomials or 1st-year calculus functions, I would call that "non-random." Again, informally; I know that precise definitions of randomness are difficult. Perhaps "predictable" is a good stand-in for "non-random?" –  Reb.Cabin Dec 24 '10 at 16:53

Try seeding with a new Guid, or, better yet, use the Cryto provider... Here's a Stko article with code

Best way to seed Random() in singleton

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How do you create new GUID? –  Craig Johnston Dec 24 '10 at 5:51
    
@Craig: Using the Guid.NewGuid method, for starters. But this is way overkill for seeding a random number generator. –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 6:07
    
@Cody: GUID generates characters as well - how could you use it as a seed? –  Craig Johnston Dec 24 '10 at 6:18
    
@Craig: I have no idea. I'm not the one who suggested it. When used properly, the Random class does everything I've ever wanted it to do. –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 6:22
    
Here's a way to seed with a Guid Random rnd = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(Guid.NewGuid().ToByteArray(), 0)); –  Reb.Cabin Dec 24 '10 at 16:19

DateTime.Now.Ticks is a Int64 type. If you cast to an int, it could be casting to the same value for the seed and therefore giving you the same random number.

No need to reseed or recreate the Random object once it is created. Just reuse the object and obtain the next random number.

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