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how i can check if my string only contain numbers ?

i dont remember.... something like isnumeric.....

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9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted
bool IsAllDigits(string s)
{
    foreach (char c in s)
    {
        if (!Char.IsDigit(c))
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Or just use LINQ:

bool IsAllDigits(string s)
{
    return s.All(Char.IsDigit);
}
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You could use Regex or int.TryParse.

See also C# Equivalent of VB's IsNumeric()

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+1 Although I disagree with the article's recommendation to avoid using library functions offered in the Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace. It's not legacy code or anything like that. If it does what you want more easily than the other solutions, use it. –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 7:57
3  
I wouldn't suggest using int.TryParse or long.TryParse, since they can overflow. –  Jim Mischel Dec 24 '10 at 9:07
    
@JimMischel: In the current version of .NET, int.TryParse() does not throw overflow exceptions. It just returns false. –  Jonathan Wood Sep 5 at 14:54
    
@JonathanWood: You misunderstood my use of the term "overflow" here. My point was that int.TryParse would return false for the value 9876543210, due to overflow. That is, the value "9,876,543,210" is too large to fit in an int. –  Jim Mischel Sep 5 at 15:13
    
@JimMischel: Ok, so you're saying it should return true in that case because all the characters are, in fact, digits. So, technically, that is correct given the question, and my (accepted) answer deals with that too. But, in practice, I suspect most people wanting this information do, in fact, plan to assign the value to an integer. TryParse() would be helpful in that case. –  Jonathan Wood Sep 5 at 15:39

int.TryParse() method will return false for non numeric strings

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5  
It will also throw an overflow exception if the string is too long. –  Jim Mischel Dec 24 '10 at 9:07
    
At least in the current version of .NET, int.TryParse() does not throw an exception if the string is too long or the integer is too big. –  Jonathan Wood Sep 5 at 0:45

Your question is not clear. Is . allowed in the string? Is ¼ allowed?

string source = GetTheString();

//only 0-9 allowed in the string, which almost equals to int.TryParse
bool allDigits = source.All(char.IsDigit); 
bool alternative = int.TryParse(source,out result);

//allow other "numbers" like ¼
bool allNumbers = source.All(char.IsNumber);
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If you want to use Regex you would have to use something like this:

string regExPattern = @"^[0-9]+$";
System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex pattern = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(regExPattern);
return pattern.IsMatch(yourString);
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public bool IsNumeric(string str)
{
    return str.All(c => "0123456789".Contains(c);
}
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You cod do like that:

public bool IsNumeric(string val)
{
    if(int.TryParse(val)) return true;
    else if(double.TryParse(val)) return true;
    else if(float.TryParse(val)) return true;
    else return false;
}
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You can write a function like this:

public bool isStringIsNumeric(string strValue)
{
    int iValue = 0;
    bool canConvert = int.TryParse(strValue, out iValue);
    if (int.TryParse(strValue, out iValue))
       return true;
    else
       return false;
}
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I have a solution...even if I'm a "little" late. It goes like this:

try
{
 double test = Convert.ToDouble(string);
}
catch(Exception e)
{
MessageBox.show("String contains non numeric characters!");
}

I know that try-catch is to be used only when needed because it takes a little out of the efficiency, but if efficiency is not an issue, you can go with this. Cheers!

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