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I’m trying to figure out how to iterate over an array of subroutine refs.

What’s wrong with this syntax?

use strict;
use warnings;

sub yell { print "Ahh!\n"; }
sub kick { print "Boot!\n"; }
sub scream { print "Eeek!\n"; }

my @routines = (\&yell, \&kick, \&scream);
foreach my $routine_ref (@routines) {
  my &routine = &{$routine_ref};
  &routine;
}

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
I don't know. What did the perl interpretor say? –  Jon Ericson Jan 17 '09 at 0:23
1  
You're iterating over them just fine. It's dereferencing them that's the real question. :) –  brian d foy Jan 17 '09 at 3:10
    
@Jon: It said I had a syntax error, but didn't suggest how to correct it. @brian d foy: Good point, I'll modify the title. :-) –  cdleary Jan 17 '09 at 11:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In your foreach loop, the following is a syntax error:

my &routine;

Your variable $routine_ref already has a reference to the subroutine, so all you need to do at that point is call it:

for my $routine_ref (@routines) {
    &{$routine_ref};
}

As always with Perl, "There's More Than One Way to Do It." For example, if any of those subroutines took parameters, you could pass them inside parenthesis like this:

for my $routine_ref (@routines) {
  $routine_ref->();
}

Also note that I've used for instead of foreach, which is a best pratice put forth by Damian Conway in Perl Best Practices.

share|improve this answer
    
I've always preferred the latter example, its less-ambiguous in behaviour to me. ( +1 ) –  Kent Fredric Jan 17 '09 at 1:43
    
You probably don't want to dereference it with just the &. Without the parens, that uses the current value of @_ as the implicit argument list, and that's usually never what you mean to do. –  brian d foy Jan 17 '09 at 3:09
    
Good point Brian. –  j_random_hacker Jan 17 '09 at 8:58
foreach my $routine_ref (@routines) {
        $routine_ref->();
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub yell { print "Ahh!\n"; }
sub kick { print "Boot!\n"; }
sub scream { print "Eeek!\n"; }

my @routines = (\&yell, \&kick, \&scream);
foreach my $routine_ref (@routines) {
  &$routine_ref ();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
&$routine_ref calls it. The parens do nothing. –  Axeman Jan 17 '09 at 2:47
use strict;
use warnings;

sub yell { print "Ahh!\n"; }
sub kick { print "Boot!\n"; }
sub scream { print "Eeek!\n"; }

my @routines = (\&yell, \&kick, \&scream);
foreach my $routine_ref (@routines) {
  &$routine_ref ();
}

What if the functions need to take arguments? Like:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub yell { print "$_[0] Ahh!\n"; }
sub kick { print " Boot!\n"; }
sub scream { print "$_[0] Eeek!\n"; }

my @routines = (\&yell(1), \&kick, \&scream(3));
foreach my $routine_ref (@routines) {
  &$routine_ref ();
}

But, this gives me error : Not a CODE reference at test.pl line 10 (thats the line &$routine_ref ();)

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't this be a new question, instead of a new answer to a very old question? Anyway you need to encapsulate the call with the parameter in a new coderef, like this: @routines = (sub{yell(1)}, \&kick, sub{scream(3)}) –  Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 2 '13 at 5:39

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