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I have some code in c# that is writing information (row by row) into an access database using prepared statements. I am using OleDb, and a TransactionLevel.ReadUncommitted because sometimes I need to look at the data before committing it.

The problem seems to be that on 1 out of 7 different tables, the ordering that I retrieve the records from the database isn't the same ordering I put them in as. This happens about 1 out of every 4 times I try to use it, so I can't really seem to debug it.

Edit The reason ordering is important here is that we are dumping the table to an excel sheet which matches up with data already existing on there. Order by might make some progress, but there is a column which is ordered by a movement (i.e. N-NW) that couldn't be ordered to match up with the data on the sheet.

I'm leaning toward it being a race condition of the prepared statement's insert command (i.e. there are too many for access to handle at once, so they get jumbled).

Does anybody have any thoughts on this? Below are a couple of snippets of what I'm doing: (Sorry about the length, I tried to cut out as much as I could but still get the main components out)

protected override void PopulateTmpTable()
  {
    OleDbCommand objComm = null;
    try
    {
      objComm = new OleDbCommand("", mDbconn);
      ...
      //Begin SQL Transaction
      mTr = mDbconn.BeginTransaction(System.Data.IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted);
      objComm.Transaction = mTr;
      //Start Populating Temp Table
      for (int i = 1; i <= mNrows; i++)
      {
        ...
        ProcessNode(objComm, node, approaches);
        ProcessNodeSummary(objComm, node);
      }
      ProcessSummary(objComm);
    }
    catch (Exception e) { }
    finally
    {
      if (mTr != null) mTr.Commit();
      if (objComm != null) objComm.Dispose();
    }
  }  //End Method PopulateTmpTable

  private void ProcessNode(OleDbCommand objComm, string node, List<string> approaches)
  {
    try
    {
      ...
      OleDbCommand objComm2 = new OleDbCommand("", mDbconn, mTr);
      for (int k = 0; k < MaxLegs; k++)
      {
        ...
            total = ProcessIterations(objComm, node, turning[m], m);
          }
          objComm.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }  //End if
      }  //End for
    }
    catch { }
  }  //End Method ProcessNode

private List<double> ProcessIterations(OleDbCommand objComm, string node, string turn, int m)
  {
    try
    {
      OleDbCommand objComm2 = new OleDbCommand("", mDbconn, mTr);
      OleDbDataReader objRead;
      objComm.Parameters["parameter"].Value = //Stuff (x2)
        for (int j = 0; j < mIterations; j++)
        {
          ...
          objComm2.CommandText = "SELECT ROUND(AVG(Delay),1), COUNT(VehNo) FROM [TABLE] WHERE NodeNo=" + node + " AND Movement='" + turn + "' AND Iteration=" + mIterationValue[j] + mFilter[1];
          objRead = objComm2.ExecuteReader();
          objRead.Read();
          try
          {
              objComm.Parameters["more parameters"].Value = objRead[0];
              ...
          }
          catch { }
          objRead.Close();
        }//End for
        ...
        objComm.ExecuteNonQuery();
        objComm2.CommandText = "UPDATE " + mTmptable + " SET ave=" + avg + ",minimum=" + mMini[m] + ",maximum=" + mMaxi[m] + ",dev=" + stDev + " WHERE node='" + node + "' AND movement = '" + temp + "';";
        objComm2.ExecuteNonQuery();
      }
    }
    catch{}
    return mTotal;
  }  //End Function ProcessIterations
share|improve this question
    
Can you clarify what you mean by "the ordering that I retrieve from the database isn't the same ordering I put them in as". Is this referring to the order of processing the tables, or the order of the records? If the latter, it's something you shouldn't worry about as that's what ORDER BY is for. – David-W-Fenton Jan 17 '09 at 19:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In Jet, the clustered index (physical ordering) of a table is determined by the PRIMARY KEY or, in absence of a PK, another key chosen (randomly?) by the engine. However, physical ordering only occurs when the database file (.mdb, .mde, .accdb) is compacted. Rows inserted subsequent to compacting (or before the first compact) are inserted in date/time order. Now, the smallest time granule supported by Jet's DATETIME data type is one second, though under the covers the value is stored as a double float, therefore I'm wondering whether the granularity is not fine enough for your purposes. But why rely on such poorly documented features of an elderly engine...?

If you know ther order in which you insert the rows then model this in the database e.g. use an INTEGER column to store a sequence number for which your app is in charge of supplying the values. And put a UNIQUE constraint on the column too, just to be sure. Then simply ORDER BY your sequence column in queries.

share|improve this answer
    
The table is created dynamically, so the number of fields is not known until runtime. So I was using SELECT *, but now I build the SELECT query at the same time as I build the table. In essence, this is exactly what I ended up doing, but this knowledge is helpful - Thanks! – Fry Jan 20 '09 at 17:36

In your PopulateTmpTable() method, you are commiting the transaction even if an error occured. Is that what you intended?

In ProcessNode() you pass in a command object, create a new one and then use the one passed in?

share|improve this answer
    
Well, most of the code in Process node was removed for brevity, the second command basically queries the source table and retrieves data to populate the temp table. Yes, the transaction is committed bcuz errors are thrown up and the table would be immediately removed with a msg to the user – Fry Jan 17 '09 at 1:01
    
I removed the error handling code too as I didn't think it was of much importance – Fry Jan 17 '09 at 1:02

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