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I know 2 ways to remove doubles from an array of objects that support explicit comparing:

  1. Using HashSet constructor and
  2. Using LINQ's Distinct().

How to remove doubles from array of structs, comparing array members by a single field only? In other words, how to write the predicate, that could be used by Distinct().

Regards,

share|improve this question
    
by "double", do you mean "duplicates"? or System.Double? –  Marc Gravell Dec 24 '10 at 10:50
    
also; you can't really "remove" items from an array, since an array is fixed size... you could overwrite them, of course.. –  Marc Gravell Dec 24 '10 at 10:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, you could implement IEqualityComparer<T> to pick out that field and use that for equality testing and hashing... or you could use DistinctBy which is in MoreLINQ.

Of course, you don't have to take a dependency on MoreLINQ really - you can implement it very simply:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>
    (this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
     Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
{
    // TODO: Implement null argument checking :)

    HashSet<TKey> keys = new HashSet<TKey>();
    foreach (TSource element in source)
    {
        if (knownKeys.Add(keySelector(element)))
        {
            yield return element;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Damn... fast... –  Philippe Dec 24 '10 at 10:52
    
And how about IComparable<TheStructInQuestion>? Would that have worked too? –  Adriaan Stander Dec 24 '10 at 10:53
    
@astander: No, because Distinct etc deal in terms of equality, not sorting. In particular, to use something like a hash table, you need to be able to get a hash code for any particular value. –  Jon Skeet Dec 24 '10 at 10:54
    
MK, I see. Would have guessed that that would be used in the equality comparison, but very good to know. X-) +1 –  Adriaan Stander Dec 24 '10 at 10:55
1  
@noober: No, it'll throw a NullReferenceException which won't make it clear what's going on at all - whereas you can throw ArgumentNullException, stating which argument was null. Also, it's generally a good idea to validate arguments before you do anything else - otherwise you might find that the method only fails half way through, leaving the system in an inconsistent state. –  Jon Skeet Dec 25 '10 at 11:35

I would probably just loop:

var values = new HashSet<FieldType>();
var newList = new List<ItemType>();
foreach(var item in oldList) {
    if(hash.Add(item.TheField)) newList.Add(item);
}
share|improve this answer
    
HashSet<T>.Add uses EqualityComparer<T>.Default as a comparer(if not specified), so it's the same as var result = arr.Distinct(); which is also using the default comparer, isn't it? –  Danny Chen Dec 24 '10 at 11:29
    
@Danny - yes, but the Distinct in the question is comparing the parent instance itself; in the code above I'm comparing a single property of the parent instance. –  Marc Gravell Dec 24 '10 at 11:31
    
Ops I misunderstood OP's question. Thanks. +1 –  Danny Chen Dec 24 '10 at 11:33

The LINQ answer has been published before. I am copying from Richard Szalay's answer here: eliminate duplicates ienumerable

public static class EnumerationExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> Distinct<TSource,TKey>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource,TKey> keySelector)
    {
        KeyComparer comparer = new KeyComparer(keySelector);

        return source.Distinct(comparer);
    }

    private class KeyComparer<TSource,TKey> : IEqualityComparer<TSource>
    {
        private Func<TSource,TKey> keySelector;

        public DelegatedComparer(Func<TSource,TKey> keySelector)
        {
            this.keySelector = keySelector;
        }

        bool IEqualityComparer.Equals(TSource a, TSource b)
        {
            if (a == null && b == null) return true;
            if (a == null || b == null) return false;

            return keySelector(a) == keySelector(b);
        }

        int IEqualityComparer.GetHashCode(TSource obj)
        {
            return keySelector(obj).GetHashCode();
        }
    }
}

Which, as Richard says, is used like this:

var distinct = arr.Distinct(x => x.Name);
share|improve this answer

implement a custom IEqualityComparer<T>

public class MyStructComparer : IEqualityComparer<MyStruct>
{
    public bool Equals(MyStruct x, MyStruct y)
    {
        return x.MyVal.Equals(y.MyVal);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(MyStruct obj)
    {
        return obj.MyVal.GetHashCode();
    }
}

then

var distincts = myStructList.Distinct(new MyStructComparer());
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