Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm running Apache on Ubuntu. My IP address is 192.168.1.101

While http://localhost and http://192.168.1.101 work fine in my PC, I cannot access it from within my laptop using http://192.168.1.102

It's strange. I can ping 192.168.1.101 but I got "The connection has timed out." in browser.

I'm using default apache config. so this is what my sites-available/default looks like:

NameVirtualHost *:80
<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost

    DocumentRoot /home/www/public_html
    <Directory />
        Options FollowSymLinks
        AllowOverride None
    </Directory>
    <Directory /home/www/public_html>
        Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews
        #AllowOverride None
        AllowOverride all
        Order allow,deny
        allow from all

    </Directory>

/etc/apache2/posrts.conf NameVirtualHost *:80 Listen 80

<IfModule mod_ssl.c>
    # If you add NameVirtualHost *:443 here, you will also have to change
    # the VirtualHost statement in /etc/apache2/sites-available/default-ssl
    # to <VirtualHost *:443>
    # Server Name Indication for SSL named virtual hosts is currently not
    # supported by MSIE on Windows XP.
    Listen 443
</IfModule>

<IfModule mod_gnutls.c>
    Listen 443
</IfModule>

my laptop runs Ubuntu as well. so I don't think this is a firewall issue.

commands executed in Laptop (192.168.1.102):

adp@adp-laptop:~$ ping 192.168.1.101
PING 192.168.1.101 (192.168.1.101) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.1.101: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=32.1 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.101: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=54.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.101: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=77.0 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.101: icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=100 ms
^C
--- 192.168.1.101 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3003ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 32.193/66.193/100.717/25.463 ms

adp@adp-laptop:~$ telnet 192.168.1.101 80
Trying 192.168.1.101...
telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection timed out

commands executed in PC (192.168.1.101):

adp@adp-desktop:~$ ps afx | grep http
12672 pts/4    S+     0:00              |               \_ grep --color=auto http

adp@adp-desktop:~$ ping 192.168.1.102
PING 192.168.1.102 (192.168.1.102) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.1.102: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=32.1 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.102: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=54.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.102: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=77.0 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.102: icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=100 ms
^C
--- 192.168.1.102 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3003ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 32.193/66.193/100.717/25.463 ms
adp@adp-desktop:~$ telnet 192.168.1.102 80
Trying 192.168.1.102...
telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused
adp@adp-desktop:~$ telnet 192.168.1.102
Trying 192.168.1.102...
telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused

What should i do?

share|improve this question
    
Whats in your /etc/apache2/ports.conf? –  Reto Aebersold Dec 24 '10 at 11:40
    
@takpar -ps afx | grep http on both PC –  ajreal Dec 24 '10 at 11:58
    
@aeby and @ajreal: i provided requested info in the question. thanks. –  Alexar Dec 24 '10 at 14:52
    
I think Its a network problem. not a problem from Apache's Side. Have you checked whether 192.168.1.101:80 is accessible from other PCs ? –  Neel Basu Dec 24 '10 at 15:20
    
"192.168.1.101:80 is NOT accessible from other PCs". this is exaclty the problem. –  Alexar Dec 24 '10 at 15:30

1 Answer 1

Because the connection is timed out (not refused) I guess it is a firewall problem check if you are using any.

There can still be an other possibility if your kernel is using black holes for closed ports (it does not send connection refused TCP packets just refuses to answer anything if the port is not used). But you mentioned that you have Listen 80 in your config file, and that means all interfaces, so the chances are good you have a firewall problem after all.

In UFW (the default firewall in Ubuntu) you can add a firewall rule to allow incoming HTTP connections to your box:

sudo ufw allow proto tcp from any to 192.168.1.101 port 80
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, how can I stop firewall (if any) in Ubuntu? –  Alexar Mar 4 '11 at 8:39
    
UFW is the default firewall in Ubuntu. If you reside on an intranet you have little need for it (because your router is a natural firewall anyway). you can disable it with: sudo ufw disable, but I added an UFW rule to the answer (not tested). –  vbence Mar 4 '11 at 9:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.