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There are many references to my question, and none of them are clear. I have searched much on Google and here to no avail for a definitive answer.

My situation
I have a web-based application running as a hosted solution. The application itself is not for sale, nor can it be downloaded. Users can create an account, and then use the application online. They can upgrade their free license to a professional license which comes with a monthly fee.

My issue
I intend to use some GPL licensed PHP classes. The code of these classes is being used as-is. Eg. The PHP code is unmodified with the exception of the configuration parameters in the top of the file.

My questions

  • Am I required to license my application under GPL eventhough I don't intend to release it's sources?
  • Am I required to indicate somewhere that my application uses GPL licensed code?
  • Am I required make the code of the classes available?
  • Am I required to pay homage to the original author of the class (in an about page)?

Thanks for any ansers, information of references regarding my issue.

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(I realize this thread of from '10). A decent new-ish site for this is tldrlegal. Type in the license and it'll give you a nice "human" version of the requirements. –  h2ooooooo Apr 24 '14 at 7:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's called the GNU GPL.

And you should clarify which version. There are minor differences in the GNU GPLv2 and GNU GPLv3 in regards to how it applies to uncompiled scripting languages.

That being said, both are distribution licenses only, not EULAs (albeit GPLv3 borders on that). You can use the code without obligations if you do not redistribute it in any way. No paying, no attribution, no publishing required on your part.

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To me this is the most correct answer of all. The main thing about my software, is that I will never "distribute" my code. The service I run IS the product. BTW: the license that comes with the code explicitly states I can use v2 OR any later version at my discretion. –  djBo Dec 26 '10 at 11:46

The best answer I can give: Get a lawyer. That's the only person you should take advice on this matter from.

As far as your questions, I'll try to answer (but don't trust me):

Am I required to license my application under GPL eventhough I don't intend to release it's sources?

Yes. But you don't have to abide by it since you are not distributing the application. Simply using it is fine. But the second you distribute it (there's a grey area as to the exact definition of distribute) you fall into the GPL copy-left clause and are required to give up your sources. If you don't distribute, you don't need to give out your code.

Am I required to indicate somewhere that my application uses GPL licensed code?

Inside the source-code only.

Am I required make the code of the classes available?

Yes, but only if you distribute the code. If you keep it for yourself, you don't have to do a thing.

Am I required to pay homage to the original author of the class (in an about page)?

No. As long as you indicate in the source code, you should be covered...

Hope that helps...

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1  
+1 for asking a lawyer. –  Erik van Brakel Dec 24 '10 at 13:37
    
+1! Thank you very much. As stated, I run the hosted machines myself. The application code has never been and never will be available to endusers. I will contact a lawyer though. Just to be safe. But as long as my service is allowed to "use" the GPL'd code without issues, I think I'm fine. –  djBo Dec 24 '10 at 13:46
1  
This is wrong. Thre GNU GPL was specifically not designed in a way that requires consulting a lawyer. It's obviously not the most understandable license on the planet, but all the raised issues have been clarified over and over again. If anyone has any questions, contacing info@fsf.org is not only cheaper, but also more reliable than a lawyer. (Who usually don't grok the license anyway. Been there.) - That being said, your explanations are correct. –  mario Dec 24 '10 at 13:47
1  
@ircmaxell: If you consult a lawyer for this specific matter, you're either paying through the nose for a very trivial issue. Or you will get invalid advise in the form of "don't do it". Both would be poor business decisions. And appearantly lawyers frequently give piss poor advises on the GNU GPL (see router vendors). Again: the FSF happily gives out clarifications, and those are more reliable. –  mario Dec 24 '10 at 13:53
1  
@mario; That's an opinion (and one that should be mentioned for sure). But there's definitely something to be said for getting independent consultation. Interpretation of the GPL, which has had very little court-room testing (actually from trial), is still a very subjective matter. Sure the FSF has a view on what's right and wrong regarding interpreting it, but that doesn't mean a thing in court. So while they do have "experience" with the GPL, their viewpoint is no more valid than any other copyright lawyer... Oh, and I never recommend taking legal advice from anyone except a lawyer... –  ircmaxell Dec 24 '10 at 14:00

As long as it's not the AGPL, which is rarely used, then you have nothing to worry about as long as you're simply using and not distributing the code.

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another question about this topic on stackoverflow:

Rebranding a GPL'd app as SaaS

Your keyword would be GPL and SaaS (Software as a Service). If you look at this link, apparently GPLv3 still permits hosting GPL'ed code as a service, without having to distribute the code.

Another thing to be aware of is that you should make sure that no part of your code is run on the client side somehow. I'm not sure how javascript fits into this, but it might be something to consider.

Also, hosting the app on a server provided by the client might be considered as distributing your code.

All in all, personally I'd try to find a non GPL alternative. GPL is pretty hard to work around, unless you intend to distribute your code freely.

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Actually Tancredi that is not quite correct when you say:

The GPL license, unlike Apache license or BSD license, require, in addiction to indicate the author of the code you're are using, to redistribute the source under GPL."

I'm not sure if the language you used was wrong by intent or by grammar but allow me to clarify:

The GPL does not require (force) anybody to distribute anything, such a requirement would be utterly unenforceable ... it only requires certain conditions be attached IF they choose to distribute GPL protected software.

I can collect every GPL software package on the planet, run them all on my home machines, and I will never be required to distribute a single byte of my collection unless I choose to do so. But if I make that choice then the GPL rules apply.

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If you are planning on distributing the software without opening the source, then this license is not for you. You should ask a lawyer, he may be able to suggest you the best license for your needs.

For your questions:

Am I required to license my application under GPL even though I don't intend to release it's sources?

Yes. GPL is a copyleft license. This means that any derived work must be licensed under the GPL as well.

Am I required to indicate somewhere that my application uses GPL licensed code?

Yes. The first rule of licensing is to include the license with the software. The terms and conditions of the GPL must be made available to anybody receiving a copy of the work that has a GPL applied to it.

Am I required make the code of the classes available?

Yes, but only if you distribute the code/software. GPL does not force you to distribute it.

Am I required to pay homage to the original author of the class (in an about page)?

Depends. If you are modifying the original GPL code, you must make sure that you leave the original author's name or say that your work is based on his. If you don't modify the original code and just use it as a library, then it's not necessary. Programmers deserve credit for their work. However it doesn't have to be in an about page

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