Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

While creating a Firefox addon, I've run into a weird problem.
I have an array of nodes, returned by some iterator. Iterator returns only nodes, containing Node.TEXT_NODE as one or more of it's children. The script runs on page load.
I have to find some text in that nodes by regexp and surround it with a SPAN tag.

//beginning skipped  
var node = nodeList[i];    
var node_html = node.innerHTML;  
var node_content = node.textContent;  
if(node_content.length > 1){  
    var new_str = "<SPAN class='bar'>" + foo + "</SPAN>";  
    var regexp = new RegExp( foo , 'g' );  
    node_html = node_html.replace(regexp, new_str);  
    node.innerHTML = node_html;  
}

Basic version looked like this, and it worked except one issue - node.innerHTML could contain attributes, event handlers, that could also contain foo, that should not be surrounded with <span> tags.
So I decided to make replacements in text nodes only. But text nodes can't contain a HTML tag, so I had to wrap them with <div>. Like this:

var node = nodeList[i];
for(var j=0; j<node.childNodes.length; j++){
    var child = node.childNodes[j];
    var child_content = child.textContent;
    if(child.nodeType == Node.TEXT_NODE && child_content.length >1){
        var newChild = document.createElement('div');
//          var newTextNode = document.createTextNode(child_content);
//          newChild.appendChild(newTextNode);
        var new_html = child_content;            
        var new_str = "<SPAN class='bar'>" + foo + "</SPAN>";
        var regexp = new RegExp( foo , 'g' );
        new_html = new_html.replace(regexp, new_str);
        newChild.innerHTML = new_html;
        alert(newChild.innerHTML);
        node.replaceChild(newChild, child);
    }
}

In this case, alert(newChild.innerHTML); shows right html. But after the page is rendered, all <div>s created are empty! I'm puzzled.
If I uncomment this code:

//          var newTextNode = document.createTextNode(child_content);  
//          newChild.appendChild(newTextNode);  

alert also shows things right, and <div>s are filled with text (textNode adding works ok) , but again without <span>s. And another funny thing is that I can't highlight that new <div>s' content with a mouse in browser.
Looks like it doesn't take new innerHTML into account, and I can't understand why.
Do I do something wrong? (I certainly do, but what? Or, is that a FF bug/feature?)

share|improve this question
    
Where does "foo" come from??? –  Pointy Dec 24 '10 at 16:37
    
could you move the var newChild definition outside of if? The scoping looks wrong. –  EFraim Dec 24 '10 at 16:38
    
@Efraim well the scoping will be OK, because of the way Javascript works. However, it makes no sense because the variable won't be initialized if the if body is not executed; even if it were initialized, if the node isn't a text node the replacement shouldn't happen anyway!! –  Pointy Dec 24 '10 at 16:46
    
Well, the code looks a bit weird because it was copy-pasted from the project with some unimportant (in this case) stuff removed to make it simpler... And you're right, that "}" is in the wrong place because of that. I'll edit the code now. Sorry for that :) –  manuna Dec 24 '10 at 18:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you are in Firefox you can use fun stuff like TreeWalker and Range. You may even be able to get rid of the code that gives you the initial array of nodes.

var walker = document.createTreeWalker(document.body, NodeFilter.SHOW_TEXT, null, false);
var range = document.createRange();
var wrapper = document.createElement('span');
wrapper.className = "wrapper";
var node;
var re = /^wrap me$/;
while (node = walker.nextNode()) {
  if (re.test(node.textContent)) {
    range.selectNode(node);
    range.surroundContents(wrapper.cloneNode(true));
  }
}

JSBin

You could tweak this so only part of the text node is wrapped by setting the range differently and TreeWalker can be filtered more.

Range / TreeWalker

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, Range totally suits for this task! And I need no more regexp replacement in this case! –  manuna Dec 27 '10 at 10:34

That code is really odd; why are those three lines outside of the if statement?

I think it should look something like this:

var node = nodeList[i];
for(var j=0; j<node.childNodes.length; j++){
  var child = node.childNodes[j];
  var child_content = child.textContent;
  if(child.nodeType == Node.TEXT_NODE && child_content.length >1){
    var newChild = document.createElement('div');
    newChild.innerHTML = '<span class="bar">' + child_content + '</span>';
    node.replaceChild(newChild, child);
}

Now I can't figure out what was going on with that regex and the replacement stuff; it makes no sense to me in the code you've posted.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, that three lines should be inside. My copy-paste error, fixed already. –  manuna Dec 24 '10 at 18:46
    
"foo" is just a number string. Regexp is used for replacement. Doesn't matter, really, it can be different, and it worked in the first case. For simplicity, assume it's a string like `var foo='123456'; –  manuna Dec 24 '10 at 18:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.