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Is there any default method in Java that can count total occurrence of a word? For example, how many times stack occurred in a string "stack is stack".

Edit: please only Java no third party library.

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By "only Java" do you mean methods which exist in the namespace java.*, or by methods which are written in Java? –  Davidann Dec 24 '10 at 17:15
    
in both ways :) –  Tweet Dec 24 '10 at 20:14
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no built-in .matchCount() method. Here is my impl.

public static int matchCount(String s, String find) {
     String[] split = s.split(" ");
     int count = 0;

     for(int i=0; i<split.length; i++){
        if(split[i].equals(find)){
           count++;
        }
     }
     return count;
 }


String s = "stack is stack";
System.out.println(matchCount(s, "stack")); // 2
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thanks hilal it works good :) just one type in your program, it should be System.out.println(matchCount(s, "stack") –  Tweet Dec 24 '10 at 17:06
    
@user431276 you are wellcome :) I updated it. –  user467871 Dec 24 '10 at 17:07
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You can use StringUtils.countMatches(string, "stack") from commons-lang. This doesn't account for word boundaries, so "stackstack" will be counted as two occurences.

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1  
are you sure StringUtils.countMatches is java function? As long as I know it is third library function –  Tweet Dec 24 '10 at 16:48
    
org.apache.commons –  user467871 Dec 24 '10 at 16:50
    
Thanks but in my question I asked for pure Java function :( –  Tweet Dec 24 '10 at 16:52
    
did you? I don't see such a limitation in the question. And btw, strictly speaking, they are called methods, not functions. –  Bozho Dec 24 '10 at 16:55
1  
org.apache.commons is pure java. you could always look at the source. –  Anon Dec 24 '10 at 16:56
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You could use:

public static int NumTimesInString(String target, String regex)
{
    return (" " + target + " ").split(regex).length - 1;
}

This will work so long as regex doesn't match a beginning or ending space... Hmm, this might not work for some cases. You might be better writing a function which uses indexOf

public static int NumTimesInString(String target, String substr)
{
    int index = 0;
    int count = -1;
    while (index != -1)
    {
        index = target.indexOf(substr, index);
        count++;
    }
    return count;
}

NOTE: not tested

Either one can be used as:

int count = NumTimesInString("hello world hello foo bar hello", "hello"); 
// count is 3
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I highly recommend using the second function over the first –  tster Dec 24 '10 at 16:53
    
test it : String s = "a is a asdasd s"; System.out.println(NumTimesInString(s, "a")); –  user467871 Dec 24 '10 at 16:56
    
infinite loop ! –  Tweet Dec 24 '10 at 16:57
    
@user431276 I wrote my implementation :) –  user467871 Dec 24 '10 at 17:02
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