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I often click on a file link in the IE and a download box just pops out. But what happens behind this scene? I know that IE always talks to web server with HTTP protocol, and HTTP is text based.

So is IE download achieved with HTTP protocol? If so, how could arbitrary file format be downloaded over a text based protocol?

And I am currently trying to make a web app which will direct my customer to download some file. My current design is to implement a web service. Customer will call this web service and the web service will return the file download URL. But then I don't know what to do with the URL. Could I just use something like File.Copy to copy the file from the URL to local disk? Or how should I treat the URL? If there's a better design, please teach me.

Many thanks...

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If you wish to try to force the browser to display the Save As dialog, please post which scripting language you intend to use, there are examples of how to do this on Stack Overflow in at least C#, Classic ASP and PHP that I know of so far. –  stealthyninja Dec 24 '10 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

By specifying the right content type, you can tell the browser what kind of data it is you are sending. In addition, there are special encodings (like Base 64) that allow binary content to be displayed as text, using only a limited set of characters and escaping everything else.

Then, there is nothing you need to do with the url. IE will know whether it can or cannot open the file and will show the download box accordingly.

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maybe it's like

<?php
// We'll be outputting a PDF
header('Content-type: application/pdf');

// It will be called downloaded.pdf
header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="downloaded.pdf"');

// The PDF source is in original.pdf
readfile('original.pdf');
?>
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Thanks, but this is too high-level. I want to know this from the perspective of protocol and possibly at the binary level. –  smwikipedia Dec 25 '10 at 11:11

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