Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on Linux and using a third party C, and bunch of third party C++ code, and I am writing my C++ code and I can't compile because the compiler complains two times as such :

error: conflicting decalarations XXXX (my variable name) error: XXXX has a previous decalratoin

XXXX is an enumeration member in two different enumeration sets within the two libraries of the third party libraries.

There are more than one cases that have the similar problem.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should include the C library header in a separate namespace.

namespace foo {
    #include <foo.h>
}

This way, because external C code does not use namespaces, the program will still link properly, but the names will (at the C++ level) not collide with your other C++ libraries any more.

share|improve this answer
    
There are about 15 C header files. And I found out six of them are problematic. When I did namespace foo { #include 1 #include 2 #include 3 .... #include 6} it does not work but when I put namespace foo in each and all of the 6 include files it works EXCEPT for one conflicting declaration #define XYZ 1 which the XYZ is used in C++ library too and the only way I can fix it is by changing it in C header file (which has by the way the namespace foo i it ) to const int XYZ = 1;. Any idea why? –  user553514 Dec 24 '10 at 19:43
6  
#defines are unaffected by namespaces. If you can change a "constant" #define to a constant variable and everything still compiles, that's probably a step in the right direction. –  aschepler Dec 24 '10 at 19:51
1  
I agree. What I don't understand is how come when I do a namespace foo { and include all my problematic header files} it does not work but when I put the namespace expression in each and every one of the six header files it work???? –  user553514 Dec 24 '10 at 19:55
    
Chris Jester-Young; do you have any comments about: What I don't understand is how come when I do a namespace foo { and include all my problematic header files} it does not work but when I put the namespace expression in each and every one of the six header files it work???? Thank you –  user553514 Dec 24 '10 at 21:46
    
@user553514: Are you using the same namespace for each header file, or a different one? My intention is that you would use a different namespace for each different library's header files. –  Chris Jester-Young Dec 24 '10 at 21:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.