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UPDATE - Due to lack of explanation from my side, I've rewritten the post.

What do you think about using Code Contracts to throw exceptions on invalid input? (I'm coding against a contract for my Service which requires the UserName not to be null or contain whitespaces)

MembershipServiceContracts.cs - Located in the service layer in a subfolder

[ContractClassFor(typeof (IMemberShipService))]
internal abstract class MemberShipServiceContracts : IMemberShipService
{
    #region IMemberShipService Members

    public MembershipCreateStatus CreateUser(string userName, string password, string email)
    {
        Contract.Requires(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(userName), "Test");
        Contract.Requires(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(password));
        Contract.Requires(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(email));

        return default(MembershipCreateStatus);
    }

    #endregion

}

MembershipService.cs - Located in my service layer

[ContractClass(typeof (MemberShipServiceContracts))]
public interface IMemberShipService
{
    MembershipCreateStatus CreateUser(string userName, string password, string email);
}

public class MemberShipService : IMemberShipService
{
    private readonly MembershipProvider _provider;

    public MemberShipService()
        : this(null)
    { }

    public MemberShipService(MembershipProvider provider)
    {
        _provider = provider ?? Membership.Provider;
    }

    #region IMemberShipService Members

    public MembershipCreateStatus CreateUser(string userName, string password, string email)
    {
        MembershipCreateStatus status;
        _provider.CreateUser(userName, password, email, null, null, true, null, out status);

        return status;
    }

    #endregion
}

AccountController.cs - located at the UI layer

Now this is the interesting part...

Should I use:

    [Authorize(Roles = "Developer")]
    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Create(CreateUserViewModel model)
    {
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(model.UserName))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("UserName May not be null or contain only white spaces.", model.UserName);
        }

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(model.Password))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Password May not be null or contain only white spaces", model.Password);
        }

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(model.Email))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Email May not be null or contain only white spaces", model.Email);
        }

        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            return Json("Model validation failed");
        }

        MembershipCreateStatus newUser = _memberShipService.CreateUser(model.UserName, model.Password,
                model.Email);

        return Json(newUser != MembershipCreateStatus.Success ? "Failed" : "Success");
    }

or:

[Authorize(Roles = "Developer")]
[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(CreateUserViewModel model)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(model.UserName),
            "UserName May not be null or contain only white spaces.");

    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(model.Password),
            "Password May not be null or contain only white spaces");

    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(model.Email),
            "Email May not be null or contain only white spaces");

    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return Json("Model validation failed");
    }

    MembershipCreateStatus newUser = _memberShipService.CreateUser(model.UserName, model.Password,
            model.Email);

    return Json(newUser != MembershipCreateStatus.Success ? "Failed" : "Success");
}

to throw the an exception if the code contracts for the CreateUser() method isnt fulfilled?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
Exceptions are for exceptional cases... if having invalid data is exceptional, go for it, otherwise, I suggest using a validationrule class or something. –  Nate Dec 24 '10 at 22:38
    
Yea, I know - and in this case if any of the 3 parameters is null or contain only white spaces the CreateUser() method in my service layer will crash. - The question is whether its bad practice to use Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>() to throw the exception. –  ebb Dec 24 '10 at 22:42
4  
Actually, "exceptions are for exceptional cases" is a design myth, according to this msdn blog: blogs.msdn.com/b/kcwalina/archive/2008/07/17/… –  KoMet Dec 28 '10 at 12:15
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A failure in a Code Contract indicates that your code has a serious bug that should be fixed. It doesn't replace validation of user input. Rather, you would first validate your user input, then attempt to process the data if determined to be valid (otherwise prompt the user to re-enter). If you then don't satisfy the target contract with your valid data, then an uncatchable exception will be thrown as you pretty obviously have a bug.

I hoped it would be a silver bullet but quickly realised I still needed my validation. After that, I grew to really love the way code contracts will replace all of my usual guard code.

Think of all the times you would get a NullReferenceException (too many for me!). Code Contracts can take that pain all away.

R.

P.s. Also, don't use contracts to validate security-sensitive data as code contracts can be turned off at runtime...

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I'm afraid to say: it depends on how you want to use code contracts.

You'd better look at the user manual, section "Usage Guidelines". Here's a small excerpt:

The easiest use of the contract tools is if you decide that you don't need to perform argument validation at runtime in release builds (Usage 1). In that case, you use the contract tools during development, but not on the shipped bits. Remember, you can ship a contract reference assembly along with your release bits so 18 clients can get runtime checking of your parameter validations on their debug builds via call-site requires checking. The second easiest approach if you need argument validation in your release build is to turn on contract checking in all builds (Usage 2). You therefore take advantage of the tools to produce the runtime strings of your conditions and to perform contract inheritance for you. You can choose to produce specic exceptions for your parameter validations, or have the default ContractException.

I'd suggest you read the whole section before making any big decisions.

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Both of the approaches are fine .

The 3 ways that one has for checking pre conditions are

  1. Contract.Requires -> a particular condition must be true upon entry to the method.

  2. Contract.Requires -> Same as above but throw exception if condition not met Requires is always compiled, so use of this method entails a hard dependency on the tools. You should decide if you want that before using this method.

  3. Your first approach --> The benefit of this type of precondition is that it is always there to perform the runtime check.

In the first approach you might want to add Contract.EndContractBlock();

I am exploring this feature myself but I think you can throw exception in your service layer and it is ok.

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Please see the updated post - sorry for the bad explanation in the first place. –  ebb Dec 25 '10 at 0:13
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