Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had to make a really small and simple script that would fill a table with string values according to these criteria:

  • 2 characters long
  • 1st character is always numeric (0-9)
  • 2nd character is (0-9) but also includes "X"
  • Values need to be inserted into a table on a database

The program would execute:

insert into table (code) values ('01');
insert into table (code) values ('02');
insert into table (code) values ('03');
insert into table (code) values ('04');
insert into table (code) values ('05');
insert into table (code) values ('06');
insert into table (code) values ('07');
insert into table (code) values ('08');
insert into table (code) values ('09');
insert into table (code) values ('0X');

And so on, until the total 110 values were inserted.

My code (just to accomplish it, not to minimize and make efficient) was:

use strict;
use DBI;
my ($db1,$sql,$sth,%dbattr);
%dbattr=(ChopBlanks => 1,RaiseError => 0);
$db1=DBI->connect('DBI:mysql:','','',\%dbattr);
my @code;
for(0..9)
{
    $code[0]=$_;
    for(0..9)
    {
        $code[1]=$_;
        insert(@code);
    }
    insert($code[0],"X");
}
sub insert
{
    my $skip=0;
    foreach(@_)
    {
        if($skip==0)
        {
            $sql="insert into table (code) values ('".$_[0].$_[1]."');"; 
            $sth=$db1->prepare($sql); 
            $sth->execute();
            $skip++;
        }
        else
        {
            $skip--;
        }
    }
}
exit;

I'm just interested to see a really succinct & precise version of this logic.

share|improve this question
    
Perl, Ruby, Python and PHP - the only languages suitable for golf with databases... it's not enough... too specific theme. –  Nakilon Dec 25 '10 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

133 characters - non-strict

use DBI;$d=DBI->connect('DBI:mysql','','',{RaiseError=>1});for$a(0..9){for$b(0..9,'X'){$d->do("insert into table values('$a$b')");}}

152 characters - strict

use strict;use DBI;my$d=DBI->connect('DBI:mysql','','',{RaiseError=>1});for my$a(0..9){for my$b(0..9,'X'){$d->do("insert into table values('$a$b')");}}

Legible version of 152 character string:

use strict;use DBI;
my $d=DBI->connect('DBI:Informix:stores','','',{RaiseError=>1});
foreach my $a (0..9)
{
    foreach my $b (0..9, 'X')
    {
        $d->do("insert into table values('$a$b')");
    }
}

Thought process

Given:

create table table(code char(2) not null);

And the Perl:

use strict;
use DBI;
my $d=DBI->connect('DBI:mysql','','',{RaiseError=>1});
my $h=$d->prepare("insert into table(code)values(?)");
foreach my $a (0..9)
{
    foreach my $b (0..9, 'X')
    {
        $h->execute("$a$b");
    }
}

I tested with Informix, so the connect string I actually used was "DBI:Informix:stores".

This solution is still readable - and because of the RaiseError, error-proofed (unless you want to add a transaction too).

Code Golfing it, it becomes (182 characters):

use strict;use DBI;my$d=DBI->connect('DBI:mysql','','',{RaiseError=>1});my$h=$d->prepare("insert into table(code)values(?)");for my$a(0..9){for my$b(0..9,'X'){$h->execute("$a$b");}}
share|improve this answer
    
i've been so used to adding the strict that i don't even stop to ask why. - so... what's it for (in a nutshell)? –  CheeseConQueso Dec 25 '10 at 0:01
    
this is great by the way.... really awesome –  CheeseConQueso Dec 25 '10 at 0:03
    
use strict; is used by experts to make sure they aren't making a silly mistake; use strict; is ignored by beginners because they don't realize it will stop them making mistakes. But when you're code golfing, every byte counts, so use strict; is antithetical to 'Code Golf'; so are multi-character names. That has to be close to minimal; there are 6 necessary spaces in the strict version (4 in the non-strict). The attribute hash could be omitted in the connect; that would save some more space (16 bytes, I believe), but I don't like dropping all error detection. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 25 '10 at 0:03
    
silly mistakes like "missing a semicolon at line 7" or using one "=" equal sign in an if comparison? –  CheeseConQueso Dec 25 '10 at 0:07
    
Yes, like those - or typos in variable names, or many others. Actually, some of them are handled by use warnings; rather than use strict; and the latter is more about abusing strings as references... –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 25 '10 at 0:33

The first part can be reduced to

for my $x (0..9) {
  for my $y (0..9,'X') {
    insert("$x$y");
  }
}

I really don't understand what $skip is doing in the second part. I'd have

sub insert {
  my $code = shift;
  my $sql="insert into table (code) values ('$code');"; 
  my $sth=$db1->prepare($sql); 
  $sth->execute();
}
share|improve this answer
    
without the skip, each line would print twice –  CheeseConQueso Dec 24 '10 at 23:59
    
oh, and thanks for the first part - i never knew you could construct for statements like that –  CheeseConQueso Dec 24 '10 at 23:59
1  
It only prints twice when you use foreach(@_) over a two-element array. By avoiding that, you also avoid the need for $skip; –  RedGrittyBrick Dec 25 '10 at 9:26

You could just do it in sql (for some values of sql):

insert into table (code) select concat(foo, bar)
from (select 0 foo union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4
    union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9)
    foo
join (select 0 bar union select 1 union select 2 union select 3 union select 4
    union select 5 union select 6 union select 7 union select 8 union select 9
    union select 'X')
    bar;
share|improve this answer
    
this is nice - never expected this to make it happen –  CheeseConQueso Dec 27 '10 at 5:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.