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I'm new to MVC and I'm introducing myself through the Codeigniter framework. As a practice application I'm creating a simple blog application that gives the ability to create, view, edit, and delete posts.

For the "edit post" page, I'm using the same view file as my "create new post" and simply populating the form fields with the data I'm getting from my model when the user is editing an old post.

This seems all fine and dandy but I'm a bit confused on what logic is stored in the Controller vs. View. I obviously need some logic that tells the form to pre-populate the form fields (if I'm editing a post) or to leave everything blank (if it's a new post). There's also other things such as the view page needs to know what title to display at the top of the page: "Create New Post" or "Edit Post".

Where does this logic go? Does it go in the View? Or does it go in the Controller? and Why? I started putting all that logic inside the view file because I've read that I should keep the controller code minimal, however I now have a big php code block at the top of my view file that's dealing with variables and I'm not sure if this is the correct approach.

Any advice would be much appreciated!

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1 Answer 1

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I obviously need some logic that tells the form to pre-populate the form fields (if I'm editing a post) or to leave everything blank (if it's a new post).

Check out the set_value() function in the Form Helper. You can do something like this in your view:

<input type="text" name="subject" value="<?php echo set_value('subject', $subject); ?>" size="50" />

If it's a new post, pass empty string as $subject when loading the View from the Controller.

If it's editing, pass the subject of the post that is being edited as $subject.

Also, if a user submits the form and there are errors and you need to reload the form, set_value() will return what the user just posted (i.e. $_POST['subject']).

There's also other things such as the view page needs to know what title to display at the top of the page: "Create New Post" or "Edit Post".

Just pass a variable named $page_title from your Controller to your View, and set the value accordingly. This is pretty common, especially when you start building reusable templates.

Where does this logic go? Does it go in the View? Or does it go in the Controller? and Why?

There should be almost no logic in the View. Maybe simple if/else statements if you must, and loops to iterate through arrays of data.

Even Controller should not have much logic in it. It is mainly responsible for acting as a middle-man between the Models, the Views and the libraries.

I've read that I should keep the controller code minimal

That has to do with Controllers vs. Models, not the Views. It is good practice to keep Controllers smaller, and put as much of the logic as possible into the Models and the libraries. Also referred to as "Skinny Controllers, Fat Models".

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Thanks for the detailed answer Burak. So just to make things clear in my own head, the logic that controls all the content to be populated in the view (whether it's a new post or an existing post being edited) will be stored in the controller through something simple such as an if/else, and the heavy lifting will be done by the model to pass the controller what data is required? –  justinl Dec 25 '10 at 7:17
    
@justinl Yeah, that sounds right. Try to keep all of the database interactions in your Models. Example: Getting the contents of a Post by an id. Or getting a list of latests Posts. –  Burak Guzel Dec 26 '10 at 2:07

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