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what is the complexity of the following c Function ?

double foo (int n) {
    int i;
    double sum;
    if (n==0) return 1.0;
    else {
        sum = 0.0;
        for (i =0; i<n; i++)
        sum +=foo(i);
        return sum;
    }
}

Please don't just post the complexity can you help me in understanding how to go about it .

EDIT: It was an objective question asked in an exam and the Options provided were 1.O(1) 2.O(n) 3.O(n!) 4.O(n^n)

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It was an objective question asked in an exam and the Options provided were 1. O(1) 2.O(n) 3.O(n!) 4.O(n^n) –  Bunny Rabbit Dec 25 '10 at 7:10
1  
@Bunny Rabbit, may be your teacher is not familiar with O notation both 3.O(n!) 4.O(n^n) is true, it's also O(2^n) and in fact Teta(2^n) –  Saeed Amiri Dec 25 '10 at 7:43
    
i guess the point is to chose the tightest bound –  Bunny Rabbit Dec 25 '10 at 7:44
2  
So should choose O(n!) –  Saeed Amiri Dec 25 '10 at 7:51
    
umm , you didn't give any explanation for O(n!) :( :( –  Bunny Rabbit Dec 25 '10 at 7:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's Θ(2^n) ( by assuming f is a running time of algorithm we have):

f(n) = f(n-1) + f(n-2) + ... + 1
f(n-1) = f(n-2) + f(n-3) + ...
==> f(n) = 2*f(n-1), f(0) = 1
==> f(n) is in O(2^n)

Actually if we ignore the constant operations, the exact running time is 2n.

Also in the case you wrote this is an exam, both O(n!) and O(n^n) are true and nearest answer to Θ(2^n) among them is O(n!), but if I was student, I'll mark both of them :)


Explanation on O(n!):

for all n >= 1: n! = n(n-1)...*2*1 >= 2*2*2*...*2 = 2^(n-1) ==>
2 * n! >= 2^n ==> 2^n is in O(n!),
Also n! <= n^n for all n >= 1 so n! is in O(n^n)

So O(n!) in your question is nearest acceptable bound to Theta(2^n)
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2  
Actually, wolfram alpha tells me its exactly 2^n but hey, details :P –  Juan Dec 25 '10 at 7:19
    
@Juan, yes I'd updated :) –  Saeed Amiri Dec 25 '10 at 7:27
1  
+1 for simplicity and clarity. –  Davidann Dec 25 '10 at 7:36

For one, it is poorly coded :)

double foo (int n) {         // foo return a double, and takes an integer parameter
    int i;                   // declare an integer variable i, that is used as a counter below
    double sum;              // this is the value that is returned
    if (n==0) return 1.0;    // if someone called foo(0), this function returns 1.0
    else { // if n != 0
        sum = 0.0;           // set sum to 0
        for (i =0; i<n; i++) // recursively call this function n times, then add it to the result
        sum +=foo(i);
        return sum;          // return the result
    }
}

You're calling foo() a total of something like n^n (where you round n down to the nearest integer)

e.g.:

foo(3)will be called 3^3 times.

Good luck, and merry Christmas.

EDIT: oops, just corrected something. Why does foo return a double? It will always return an integer, not a double.

Here would be a better version, with micro-optimizations! :D

int foo(int n)
{
    if(n==0) return 1;
    else{
        int sum = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        sum += foo(i);
        return sum;
    }
}
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2  
"Why does foo return double?" Because, it's double. (Tautology FTW!) –  muntoo Dec 25 '10 at 6:58
1  
Casting sum as an int will be the exact same value. You can take up 4 bytes of memory instead of 8 bytes by using int instead of double. i is incremented by one, which is compared to n, so the function is always called recursively with an integer as an argument. It will never need to return a double, unless you're doing super negative or positive numbers. –  Thomas Havlik Dec 25 '10 at 7:01
3  
-1, it seems to be n^n but is 2^n and is very different. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 25 '10 at 7:08
    
Sure, there's an exception for negative numbers. It won't call recursively, because i will always be greater than n. –  Thomas Havlik Dec 25 '10 at 17:03

You could have been a bit more clearer... grumble grumble

<n = ?> : <return value> : <number of times called>
n = 0 : 1 : 1
n = 1 : 1 : 2
n = 2 : 2 : 4
n = 3 : 4 : 8
n = 4 : 8 : 16
n = 5 : 16 : 32
n = 6 : 32 : 64
n = 7 : 64 : 128
n = 8 : 128 : 256
n = 9 : 256 : 512
n = 10 : 512 : 1024

number_of_times_called = pow(2, n-1);

Let's try putting in inputs, shall we?

Using this code:

#include <iostream>

double foo (int n) {
    int i;
    double sum;
    if (n==0) return 1.0;
    else {
        sum = 0.0;
        for (i =0; i<n; i++)
        sum +=foo(i);
        return sum;
    }
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    for(int n = 0; 1; n++)
    {
       std::cout << "n = " << n << " : " << foo(n);
       std::cin.ignore();
 }

    return(0);
}

We get:

n = 0 : 1
n = 1 : 1
n = 2 : 2
n = 3 : 4
n = 4 : 8
n = 5 : 16
n = 6 : 32
n = 7 : 64
n = 8 : 128
n = 9 : 256
n = 10 : 512

Therefore, it can be simplified to:

double foo(int n)
{
    return((double)pow(2, n));
}

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1  
Nice anwser, but terribly off topic. –  Juan Dec 25 '10 at 7:18
    
@Juan The OP wasn't clear enough... At least, when I first looked at the question. Mostly, all I saw was the code and "can u explain this", or something similar. –  muntoo Dec 25 '10 at 7:32

The function is composed of multiple parts.

The first bit of complexity is the if(n==0)return 1.0;, since that only generates one run. That would be O(1).

The next part is the for(i=0; i<n; i++) loop. Since that loops from 0..n it is O(n)

Than there is the recursion, for every number in n you run the function again. And in that function again the loop, and the next function. And so on...

To figure out what it will be I recommend you add a global ounter inside of the loop so you can see how many times it is executed for a certain number.

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Look at my answer for number of times executed. –  muntoo Dec 25 '10 at 7:35

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