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I have a basic node js app that I am trying to get off the ground using Express framework. I have a Views folder where I have an "index.html" file. But I receive the following error when loading the web browser.

Error: Cannot find module 'html'

Below is my code. What am I missing here?

var express = require('express');

var app = express.createServer();

app.use(express.staticProvider(__dirname + '/public'));

app.get('/', function(req, res) {

    res.render('index.html');
});


// spin up server
app.listen(8080, '127.0.0.1')
share|improve this question

16 Answers 16

up vote 40 down vote accepted

From the Express.js Guide: View Rendering

View filenames take the form Express.ENGINE, where ENGINE is the name of the module that will be required. For example the view layout.ejs will tell the view system to require('ejs'), the module being loaded must export the method exports.render(str, options) to comply with Express, however app.register() can be used to map engines to file extensions, so that for example "foo.html" can be rendered by jade.

So either you create your own simple renderer or you just use jade:

 app.register('.html', require('jade'));

More about app.register.

Note that in Express 3, this method is renamed app.engine

share|improve this answer
44  
Note- app.register has been renamed app.engine in Express 3. –  Spongeboy Jul 16 '12 at 8:18
3  
See answer from Andrew Homeyer. It is the actual answer. –  David Betz May 30 '13 at 3:44

Many of these answers are out of date.

Using express 3.0.0 and 3.1.0, the following works:

app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
app.engine('html', require('ejs').renderFile);

Then you can do something like:

app.get('/about', function (req, res)
{
    res.render('about.html');
});

This assumes you have your views in the views subfolder, and that you have installed the ejs node module. If not, run the following on a Node console:

npm install ejs
share|improve this answer
1  
thanks Drew, this works perfectly with 3.1.0 –  Michael Dausmann Feb 2 '13 at 23:25
    
@MichaelDausmann, cheers, I've included that info in the answer. –  Drew Noakes Feb 3 '13 at 14:21
    
How does this work if I have a layout.html? –  cggaurav Feb 23 '13 at 17:36
3  
With Express 3.4.2: app.set('view engine', 'ejs'); –  roland Oct 19 '13 at 12:52
2  
You should use the command 'npm install ejs --save' to update your package.json –  Tom Teman Feb 21 at 17:55

You can have jade include a plain HTML page:

in views/index.jade

include plain.html

in views/plain.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
...

and app.js can still just render jade:

res.render(index)
share|improve this answer
2  
Wow! Simple and effective! I tried the above solutions without being able to make them work. Nice job! –  diosney Feb 6 '13 at 1:13
    
Just to note that what I want was to serve only one .html file because my app was single page ;) –  diosney Feb 6 '13 at 1:20
    
Dude, you saved my day! This should be THE final answer to this issue! Thanks! –  Vidal Quevedo Feb 23 '13 at 0:25
    
This does seem to be the best solution. –  David Betz May 30 '13 at 3:43
    
@aherric Please promote this as the final answer –  Konza Mar 14 at 13:55

try this. it works for me.

app.configure(function(){

  .....

  // disable layout
  app.set("view options", {layout: false});

  // make a custom html template
  app.register('.html', {
    compile: function(str, options){
      return function(locals){
        return str;
      };
    }
  });
});

....

app.get('/', function(req, res){
  res.render("index.html");
});
share|improve this answer
2  
had trouble with the exact configuration above, so I removed the dot from ".html" and added this: app.set('view engine', 'html'); app.set('views', __dirname + '/views'); for a perfect render –  Bijou Trouvaille Feb 5 '12 at 14:13
8  
This is a bit weird... you should serve html as static files. This also gives you the benefit of better caching. Creating a custom "html compiler" seems wrong. If you need to send a file from within a route (which you very rarely need to do) just read and send it. Otherwise just redirect to the static html. –  enyo Mar 7 '12 at 11:37
2  
@Enyo this comment seems odd, considering HOW TO do what you are saying should be done is THE QUESTION BEING ASKED, and your answer is to just do it. How do you serve a static html with caching? –  Tyrsius May 28 '12 at 7:17
    
@Tyrsius, well not really. I'm saying that you shouldn't just render an html file. If you really really have to send it from within a route you could read the file with fs and then send the plain text. What I suggest doing is redirecting to the html file instead of trying to directly render it inside the route. –  enyo Jul 9 '12 at 15:27
3  
I see an error on app.register. Perhaps it's been deprecated in express 3.0.0.rc3? TypeError: Object function app(req, res){ app.handle(req, res); } has no method 'register' –  Drew Noakes Aug 17 '12 at 14:30

You could also read the html file and send it.

app.get('/', function(req, res) {
    fs.readFile(__dirname + '/public/index.html', 'utf8', function(err, text){
        res.send(text);
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
should be res.send(), right? –  barraponto Jun 24 '12 at 19:56
    
@barraponto updated, thanks –  keegan3d Jun 25 '12 at 22:03
15  
this solution is bad because no caching of the files ; it is read for every request. –  Marcel Falliere Sep 5 '12 at 8:17
    
its potentially pretty easy to cache it manually. Just store the read file a variable, and only read again, if that variable is blank. You could also use a JS object and store various files in various variables, with timestamps. Sure its more work than most people would do, but it's good with people new to node. It's easy to understand –  Naman Goel Oct 21 '12 at 17:22
3  
Yikes. This defeats the entire point of convention-oriented, streamlined architectures (like MVC). –  David Betz May 30 '13 at 3:41

I also faced the same issue in express 3.X and node 0.6.16. The above given solution will not work for latest version express 3.x. They removed the app.register method and added app.engine method. If you tried the above solution you may end up with the following error.

node.js:201
        throw e; // process.nextTick error, or 'error' event on first tick
              ^
TypeError: Object function app(req, res){ app.handle(req, res); } has no method 'register'
    at Function.<anonymous> (/home/user1/ArunKumar/firstExpress/app.js:37:5)
    at Function.configure (/home/user1/ArunKumar/firstExpress/node_modules/express/lib/application.js:399:61)
    at Object.<anonymous> (/home/user1/ArunKumar/firstExpress/app.js:22:5)
    at Module._compile (module.js:441:26)
    at Object..js (module.js:459:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:348:31)
    at Function._load (module.js:308:12)
    at Array.0 (module.js:479:10)
    at EventEmitter._tickCallback (node.js:192:40)

To get rid of the error message. Add the following line to your app.configure function

app.engine('html', require('ejs').renderFile);

Note: you have to install ejs template engine

npm install -g ejs

Example:

app.configure(function(){

  .....

  // disable layout
  app.set("view options", {layout: false});

  app.engine('html', require('ejs').renderFile);

....

app.get('/', function(req, res){
  res.render("index.html");
});

Note: The simplest solution is to use ejs template as view engine. There you can write raw HTML in *.ejs view files.

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you have to install ejs globally? –  Drew Noakes Aug 17 '12 at 14:34
    
it's tell me it can't find the 'index.html' file –  ioSamurai Dec 22 '12 at 3:00
app.get('/', function (req, res) {
res.sendfile(__dirname + '/public/index.html');
});
share|improve this answer
3  
sendfile is not cache in production mode so this is not a good solution. –  Seymour Cakes Feb 5 '12 at 11:19

Quite late answer but because was facing the same issue decided to post it here.

If you using express@~3.0.0 change below line from your example:

app.use(express.staticProvider(__dirname + '/public'));

to something like this:

app.set("view options", {layout: false});
app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));

I made it as described on express api page and it works like charm. With that setup you don't have to write additional code so it becomes easy enough to use for your micro production or testing.

Full code listed below:

var express = require('express');
var app = express.createServer();

app.set("view options", {layout: false});
app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));

app.get('/', function(req, res) {
    res.render('index.html');
});

// spin up server
app.listen(8080, '127.0.0.1')
share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you repeat app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public')); after you start the server with app.listen? –  fatuhoku Mar 5 '13 at 14:44
    
You don't actually. My bad. Just corrected it. –  Mark Karwowski Nov 21 '13 at 1:16

If you don't have to use the views directory, Simply move html files to the public directory below.

and then, add this line into app.configure instead of '/views'.

server.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
share|improve this answer

For my project I have created this structure:

index.js
css/
    reset.css
html/
    index.html

This code serves index.html for / requests, and reset.css for /css/reset.css requests. Simple enough, and the best part is that it automatically adds cache headers.

var express = require('express'),
    server = express();

server.configure(function () {
    server.use('/css', express.static(__dirname + '/css'));
    server.use(express.static(__dirname + '/html'));
});

server.listen(1337);
share|improve this answer

I was trying to set up an angular app with an express RESTful API and landed on this page multiple times though it wasn't helpful. Here's what I found that worked:

app.configure(function() {
    app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));         // set the static files location
    app.use(express.logger('dev'));                         // log every request to the console
    app.use(express.bodyParser());                          // pull information from html in POST
    app.use(express.methodOverride());                      // simulate DELETE and PUT
    app.use(express.favicon(__dirname + '/public/img/favicon.ico'));
});

Then in the callback for your api routes look like: res.jsonp(users);

Your client side framework can handle routing. Express is for serving the API.

My home route looks like this:

app.get('/*', function(req, res) {
    res.sendfile('./public/index.html'); // load the single view file (angular will handle the page changes on the front-end)
});
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I usually use this

app.configure(function() {
    app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/web'));
});

Just be careful because that'll share anything in the /web directory.

I hope it helps

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1) The best way is to set static folder. In your main file (app.js | server.js | ???):

app.use(express.static(path.join(__dirname, 'public')));

public/css/form.html
public/css/style.css

Then you got static file from "public" folder:

http://YOUR_DOMAIN/form.html
http://YOUR_DOMAIN/css/style.css

2)

You can create your file cache.
Use method fs.readFileSync

var cache = {};
cache["index.html"] = fs.readFileSync( __dirname + '/public/form.html');

app.get('/', function(req, res){    
    res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/html');
    res.send( cache["index.html"] );                                
};);
share|improve this answer

With Express 4.0.0, the only thing you have to do is comment out 2 lines in app.js:

/* app.set('views', path.join(__dirname, 'views'));
app.set('view engine', 'jade'); */ //or whatever the templating engine is.

And then drop your static file into the /public directory. Example: /public/index.html

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if you are using express framework to node.js

install npm ejs

then add config file

app.set('port', process.env.PORT || 3000);
app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
app.set('view engine', 'ejs');
app.set('view engine', 'jade');
app.use(express.favicon());
app.use(express.logger('dev'));
app.use(express.bodyParser());
app.use(express.methodOverride());
app.use(app.router)

;

render the page from exports module form.js have the html file in the views dir with extension of ejs file name as form.html.ejs

then create the form.js

res.render('form.html.ejs');

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//@Error: Cannot find module 'html'

//.. file is somewhere else!!!

console.log('Current uri: ' + uri); // u are lookin for this file
console.log('Current directory: ' + process.cwd()); //!!!>>> Current directory: c:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules

// put into working dir
console.log('Starting directory: ' + process.cwd());
try {
  process.chdir('c:\\3W\\JavaScript\\node.js\\x4node\\sampleDir');
  console.log('New directory: ' + process.cwd()); //!!!>>> New directory: c:\3W\JavaScript\node.js\x4node\sampleDir
}
catch (err) {
  console.log('chdir: ' + err);
}
// try this to see where u are!
// (process.cwd@http://nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/index.html)
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