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I´ve created a object like this:

company1.name = 'banana' 
company1.value = 40

I would like to save this object. How can I do that?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 80 down vote accepted

You could use the pickle module in the standard library.
Here's a simple way of applying it to your example:

import pickle

class Company:
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name = name
        self.value = value

with open('company_data.pkl', 'wb') as output:
    company1 = Company('banana', 40)
    pickle.dump(company1, output, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

    company2 = Company('spam', 42)
    pickle.dump(company2, output, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

company1 = None
company2 = None

with open('company_data.pkl', 'rb') as input:
    company1 = pickle.load(input)
    print company1.name
    # banana
    print company1.value
    # 40

    company2 = pickle.load(input)
    print company2.name
    # spam
    print company2.value
    # 42

Here's a simple utility that opens a file, writes a single object to it, and then closes it:

def save_object(obj, filename):
    with open(filename, 'wb') as output:
        pickle.dump(obj, output, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

save_object(company1, r'c:\my_python_object.pkl')

Update:

Since this is such a popular answer, I'd like touch on a few slightly advanced usage topics.

First, it's almost always preferable to actually use the cPickle module rather than pickle because the former is written in C and much faster. There are some subtle differences between them, but in most situations they're equivalent and the C version will provide greatly superior performance. Switching to it couldn't be easier, just change theimportstatement to this:

import cPickle as pickle

Secondly, instead of writing pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL in every call (assuming that's what you want, and you usually do), you can instead just use the literal -1.
So, instead of writing:

pickle.dump(obj, output, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

You can just write:

pickle.dump(obj, output, -1)

Which is quite a bit shorter.

An even better way where you only have specify the protocol once is to create a Pickler object and use it to do multiple pickle operations:

pickler = pickle.Pickler(output, -1)
pickler.dump(obj1)
pickler.dump(obj2)
   etc...
share|improve this answer
    
@Martineau: Oh, Thank you so much for this piece of code!! –  Peterstone Dec 25 '10 at 9:40
    
This is rare to me because I imagined there would be a easier way to do save a object... Something like 'saveobject(company1,c:\mypythonobjects) –  Peterstone Dec 25 '10 at 9:45
    
@Peterstone: If you only wanted to store one object you would only need about half as much code as in my example -- I purposefully wrote it the way I did to show how more than one object could be saved into (and later read back from) the same file. –  martineau Dec 25 '10 at 9:57
1  
@Peterstone, there is a very good reason for the separation of responsibilities. This way there is no limitation on how the data from the pickling process is being used. You can store it to disc or you could also send it accross a network connection. –  Harald Scheirich Dec 25 '10 at 16:20
2  
@martinaeau, this was in response to perstones remark about one should have just one function to save an object to disk. The pickles responsibility is only to turn an object into data that can be handled as a chunk. Writing things to file is the file objects responsibility. By keeping things separate one enables higher reuse e.g. being able to send the pickled data accross a network connection or storing it in a database, all responsibilities separate from the actual data<->object conversion –  Harald Scheirich Jan 1 '11 at 22:38

I think it's a pretty strong assumption to assume that the object is a class. What if it's not a class? There's also the assumption that the object was not defined in the interpreter. What if it was defined in the interpreter? Also, what if the attributes were added dynamically? When some python objects have attributes added to their __dict__ after creation, pickle doesn't respect the addition of those attributes (i.e. it 'forgets' they were added -- because pickle serializes by reference to the object definition).

In all these cases, pickle and cPickle can fail you horribly.

If you are looking to save an object (arbitrarily created), where you have attributes (either added in the object definition, or afterward)… your best bet is to use dill, which can serialize almost anything in python.

We start with a class…

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import pickle
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> with open('company.pkl', 'wb') as f:
...     pickle.dump(company1, f, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)
... 
>>> 

Now shut down, and restart...

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import pickle
>>> with open('company.pkl', 'rb') as f:
...     company1 = pickle.load(f)
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1378, in load
    return Unpickler(file).load()
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 858, in load
dispatch[key](self)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1090, in load_global
    klass = self.find_class(module, name)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1126, in find_class
    klass = getattr(mod, name)
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Company'
>>> 

Oops… pickle can't handle it. Let's try dill. We'll throw in another object type (a lambda) for good measure.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill       
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> 
>>> company2 = lambda x:x
>>> company2.name = 'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value = 42
>>> 
>>> with open('company_dill.pkl', 'wb') as f:
...     dill.dump(company1, f)
...     dill.dump(company2, f)
... 
>>> 

And now read the file.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> with open('company_dill.pkl', 'rb') as f:
...     company1 = dill.load(f)
...     company2 = dill.load(f)
... 
>>> company1 
<__main__.Company instance at 0x107909128>
>>> company1.name
'banana'
>>> company1.value
40
>>> company2.name
'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value
42
>>>    

It works. The reason pickle fails, and dill doesn't, is that dill treats __main__ like a module (for the most part), and also can pickle class definitions instead of pickling by reference (like pickle does). The reason dill can pickle a lambda is that it gives it a name… then pickling magic can happen.

Actually, there's an easier way to save all these objects, especially if you have a lot of objects you've created. Just dump the whole python session, and come back to it later.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> 
>>> company2 = lambda x:x
>>> company2.name = 'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value = 42
>>> 
>>> dill.dump_session('dill.pkl')
>>> 

Now shut down your computer, go enjoy an espresso or whatever, and come back later...

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> dill.load_session('dill.pkl')
>>> company1.name
'banana'
>>> company1.value
40
>>> company2.name
'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value
42
>>> company2
<function <lambda> at 0x1065f2938>

The only major drawback is that dill is not part of the standard python distribution, so if you can't install a 3rd party module, then you can't use it.

If you can, however, get dill here: https://github.com/uqfoundation

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting a TypeError: __new__() takes at least 2 arguments (1 given) when trying to use dill (which looks promising) with a rather complex object that includes an audio file. –  MikeiLL Aug 27 '14 at 18:24
1  
@MikeiLL: You are getting a TypeError when you do what, exactly? That's usually a sign of having the wrong number of arguments when instantiating a class instance. If this is not part of the workflow of the above question, could you post it as another question, submit it to me over email, or add it as an issue on the dill github page? –  Mike McKerns Aug 27 '14 at 20:01

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