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I use huge data files, sometimes I only need to know the number of lines in these files, usually I open them up and read them line by line until I reach the end of the file

I was wondering if there is a smarter way to do that

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When you say 'in Java' do you mean that you want to count lines of .java files, or that you want to write Java code that counts the number of lines in a text file? –  Peter Hilton Jan 17 '09 at 9:34
    
I want to write Java code that counts the number of lines in a text file –  Mark Jan 17 '09 at 17:53

12 Answers 12

up vote 126 down vote accepted

This is the fastest version I have found so far, about 6 times faster than readLines. On a 150MB log file this takes 0.35 seconds, versus 2.40 seconds when using readLines(). Just for fun, linux' wc -l command takes 0.15 seconds.

public static int countLines(String filename) throws IOException {
    InputStream is = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(filename));
    try {
        byte[] c = new byte[1024];
        int count = 0;
        int readChars = 0;
        boolean empty = true;
        while ((readChars = is.read(c)) != -1) {
            empty = false;
            for (int i = 0; i < readChars; ++i) {
                if (c[i] == '\n') {
                    ++count;
                }
            }
        }
        return (count == 0 && !empty) ? 1 : count;
    } finally {
        is.close();
    }
}
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you were right david, I thought the JVM would be good enough for this... I have updated the code, this one is faster. –  martinus Jan 17 '09 at 10:01
1  
BufferedInputStream should be doing the buffering for you, so I don't see how using an intermediate byte[] array will make it any faster. You're unlikely to do much better than using readLine() repeatedly anyway (since that will be optimized towards by the API). –  wds Jan 17 '09 at 13:23
15  
You're going to close that InputStream when you're done with it, aren't you? –  bendin May 24 '09 at 18:15
1  
Works good until I use it on some MAC format files or some files in which the last line doesn't have a '\n' character. The number will be incorrect in those situations. Although it is fast but I think I will stick to to "fit-all" readLine() method. –  newguy Mar 14 '11 at 6:21
4  
Two things: (1) The definition of a line terminator in Java source is a carriage return, a line feed, or a carriage return followed by a line feed. Your solution won't work for CR used as a line terminator. Granted, the only OS of which I can think that uses CR as the default line terminator is Mac OS prior to Mac OS X. (2) Your solution assumes a character encoding such as US-ASCII or UTF-8. The line count may be inaccurate for encodings such as UTF-16. –  Nathan Ryan Sep 21 '12 at 11:58

I have implemented another solution to the problem, I found it more efficient in counting rows:

LineNumberReader  lnr = new LineNumberReader(new FileReader(new File("File1")));
lnr.skip(Long.MAX_VALUE);
System.out.println(lnr.getLineNumber());
// Finally, the LineNumberReader object should be closed to prevent resource leak
lnr.close();
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1  
worked perfectly for me! I prefer your shorter approach (+1). Also, made one minor edit: new LineNumberReader(new FileReader("File1")) passing a String to FileReader (instead of a File object) shortens the code a tiny bit more and requires 1 less import statement. –  gmale Sep 18 '11 at 12:28
23  
then again... if your file is longer than Long.MAX_VALUE, then the world comes to an end. That would require a file bigger than 16 Exabytes (2^64/2^60 = 2^4 = 16 Exabytes), so the world is safe. For now. :) –  gmale Sep 18 '11 at 12:40
1  
Please note this code is potentially buggy. Reader.skip() might return any number as long as one or more characters are read. It should read sth like: while(lnr.skip(Long.MAX_VALUE) > 0) {}; Also, you fail to close the Readers afterwards. –  Dibbeke Jul 24 '12 at 9:11
4  
The above code does not always return the correct number of lines in a text file. For instance, a text file with just 1 line of text won't have any new line characters, thus the above code would return 0 when in reality it should return 1. In order to fix this issue, one would have to read the last character in the file, and if it is not a new line character, then the number of lines returned should be incremented by 1. –  PB_MLT Aug 8 '12 at 14:13
4  
Please adjust your code to return lnr.getLineNumber() + 1 as LineNumberReader starts from line 0, not from line 1. –  Timmos Jan 30 '13 at 11:03

The accepted answer has an off by one error for multi line files which don't end in newline. A one line file ending without a newline would return 1, but a two line file ending without a newline would return 1 too. Here's an implementation of the accepted solution which fixes this. The endsWithoutNewLine checks are wasteful for everything but the final read, but should be trivial time wise compared to the overall function.

public int count(String filename) throws IOException {
    InputStream is = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(filename));
    try {
        byte[] c = new byte[1024];
        int count = 0;
        int readChars = 0;
        boolean endsWithoutNewLine = false;
        while ((readChars = is.read(c)) != -1) {
            for (int i = 0; i < readChars; ++i) {
                if (c[i] == '\n')
                    ++count;
            }
            endsWithoutNewLine = (c[readChars - 1] != '\n');
        }
        if(endsWithoutNewLine) {
            ++count;
        } 
        return count;
    } finally {
        is.close();
    }
}
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2  
Good catch. Not sure why you didn't just edit the accepted answer and make a note in a comment though. Most people won't read down this far. –  Ryan Dec 11 '13 at 21:33
    
@Ryan , it just didn't feel right to edit a 4 year old accepted answer with 90+ upvotes. –  AFinkelstein Dec 12 '13 at 6:47
    
@AFinkelstein, I feel that is what makes this site so great, that you can edit the top voted answer. –  Sebastian Godelet Jan 27 at 8:48
    
This solution does not handle carriage return (\r) and carriage return followed by a linefeed (\r\n) –  Simon Brandhof Feb 5 at 13:36
    
@Simon Brandhof, I'm confused on why a carriage return would be counted as another line? A "\n" is a Carriage return line feed, so whoever writes "\r\n" is not understanding something... Plus he is searching char by char, so I'm pretty sure if someone were to use "\r\n" it would still catch the "\n" and count the line. Either way I think he made the point just fine. However, their are many scenarios where this is not a sufficient way to get a line count. –  nixxbb Apr 8 at 3:46

The answer with the method count() above gave me line miscounts if a file didn't have a newline at the end of the file - it failed to count the last line in the file.

This method works better for me:

public int countLines(String filename) throws IOException {
    LineNumberReader reader  = new LineNumberReader(new FileReader(filename));
int cnt = 0;
String lineRead = "";
while ((lineRead = reader.readLine()) != null) {}

cnt = reader.getLineNumber(); 
reader.close();
return cnt;
}
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In this case, there is no need of using LineNumberReader, simply use BufferedReader, in that case you'l have flexibility to use long datatype for cnt. –  dj aqeel Jan 30 at 8:02

Once is out (March 2014) you'll be able to use streams:

try (CloseableStream<String> lines = Files.lines(file, Charset.defaultCharset())) {
  long numOfLines = lines.count();
  ...
}
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On Unix-based systems, use the wc command on the command-line.

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13  
wc -l for the line count.. –  Iain Holder Jan 17 '09 at 9:05
    
@IainmH, your second suggestion just counts the number of entries in the current directory. Not what was intended? (or asked for by the OP) –  Paul Jan 17 '09 at 10:14
    
@IainMH: that's what wc does anyway (reading the file, counting line-ending). –  PhiLho Jan 17 '09 at 11:29
    
@PhiLho You'd have to use the -l switch to count the lines. (Don't you? - it's been a while) –  Iain Holder Jan 17 '09 at 12:24
    
@Paul - you are of course 100% right. My only defence is that I posted that before my coffee. I'm as sharp as a button now. :D –  Iain Holder Jan 17 '09 at 12:25

I know this is an old question, but the accepted solution didn't quite match what I needed it to do. So, I refined it to accept various line terminators (rather than just line feed) and to use a specified character encoding (rather than ISO-8859-n). All in one method (refactor as appropriate):

public static long getLinesCount(String fileName, String encodingName) throws IOException {
    long linesCount = 0;
    File file = new File(fileName);
    FileInputStream fileIn = new FileInputStream(file);
    try {
        Charset encoding = Charset.forName(encodingName);
        Reader fileReader = new InputStreamReader(fileIn, encoding);
        int bufferSize = 4096;
        Reader reader = new BufferedReader(fileReader, bufferSize);
        char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
        int prevChar = -1;
        int readCount = reader.read(buffer);
        while (readCount != -1) {
            for (int i = 0; i < readCount; i++) {
                int nextChar = buffer[i];
                switch (nextChar) {
                    case '\r': {
                        // The current line is terminated by a carriage return or by a carriage return immediately followed by a line feed.
                        linesCount++;
                        break;
                    }
                    case '\n': {
                        if (prevChar == '\r') {
                            // The current line is terminated by a carriage return immediately followed by a line feed.
                            // The line has already been counted.
                        } else {
                            // The current line is terminated by a line feed.
                            linesCount++;
                        }
                        break;
                    }
                }
                prevChar = nextChar;
            }
            readCount = reader.read(buffer);
        }
        if (prevCh != -1) {
            switch (prevCh) {
                case '\r':
                case '\n': {
                    // The last line is terminated by a line terminator.
                    // The last line has already been counted.
                    break;
                }
                default: {
                    // The last line is terminated by end-of-file.
                    linesCount++;
                }
            }
        }
    } finally {
        fileIn.close();
    }
    return linesCount;
}

This solution is comparable in speed to the accepted solution, about 4% slower in my tests (though timing tests in Java are notoriously unreliable).

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Only way to know how many lines there are in file is to count them. You can of course create a metric from your data giving you an average length of one line and then get the file size and divide that with avg. length but that won't be accurate.

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Interesting downvote, no matter what command line tool you're using they all DO THE SAME THING anyway, only internally. There's no magic way to figure out the number of lines, they have to be counted by hand. Sure it can be saved as metadata but that's a whole another story... –  Esko Jan 17 '09 at 9:27
1  
+1 to make you feel better. –  Richard Walton Jan 17 '09 at 11:04

If you don't have any index structures, you'll not get around the reading of the complete file. But you can optimize it by avoiding to read it line by line and use a regex to match all line terminators.

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Sounds like a neat idea. Anyone tried it and has a regexp for it? –  willcodejavaforfood Jan 17 '09 at 11:02
1  
I doubt it is such a good idea: it will need to read the whole file at once (martinus avoids this) and regexes are overkill (and slower) for such usage (simple search of fixed char(s)). –  PhiLho Jan 17 '09 at 11:31
    
@will: what about /\n/ ? @PhiLo: Regex Executors are highly-tuned performance machines. Except the read-everything-into-memory caveat, I don't think that a manual implementation can be faster. –  David Schmitt May 17 '11 at 11:37

How about using the Process class from within Java code? And then reading the output of the command.

Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("wc -l " + yourfilename);
p.waitFor();

BufferedReader b = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
String line = "";
int lineCount = 0;
while ((line = b.readLine()) != null) {
    System.out.println(line);
    lineCount = Integer.parseInt(line);
}

Need to try it though. Will post the results.

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A straight-forward way using Scanner

static void lineCounter (String path) throws IOException {

        int lineCount = 0, commentsCount = 0;

        Scanner input = new Scanner(new File(path));
        while (input.hasNextLine()) {
            String data = input.nextLine();

            if (data.startsWith("//")) commentsCount++;

            lineCount++;
        }

        System.out.println("Line Count: " + lineCount + "\t Comments Count: " + commentsCount);
    }
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if you use this

public int countLines(String filename) throws IOException {
    LineNumberReader reader  = new LineNumberReader(new FileReader(filename));
    int cnt = 0;
    String lineRead = "";
    while ((lineRead = reader.readLine()) != null) {}

    cnt = reader.getLineNumber(); 
    reader.close();
    return cnt;
}

you cant run to big num rows, likes 100K rows, because return from reader.getLineNumber is int. you need long type of data to process maximum rows..

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10  
An int can hold values of up to, approximately, 2 billion. If you are loading a file with more than 2 billion lines, you have an overflow problem. That said, if you are loading an unindexed text file with more than two billion lines, you probably have other problems. –  Adam Norberg Jun 2 '11 at 21:26

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