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Sample code:

int ar[3];
............
ar[0] = 123;
ar[1] = 456;
ar[2] = 789;

Is there any way to init it shorter? Something like:

int ar[3];
............
ar[] = { 123, 456, 789 };

I don't need solution like:

int ar[] = { 123, 456, 789 };

Definition and initialization must be separate.

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Terminology: Initialization is giving a value at the moment of definition. What you want is "array assignment". –  Kos Jan 1 '11 at 22:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are asking for cannot be done directly. There are, however different things that you can do there, starting from creation of a local array initialized with the aggregate initialization and then memcpy-ed over your array (valid only for POD types), or using higher level libraries like boost::assign.

// option1
int array[10];
//... code
{
   int tmp[10] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }
   memcpy( array, tmp, sizeof array ); // ! beware of both array sizes here!!
}  // end of local scope, tmp should go away and compiler can reclaim stack space

I don't have time to check how to do this with boost::assign, as I hardly ever work with raw arrays.

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Thanks. I just thought that exists some way in this language or in compiler extensions. –  kirmir Dec 25 '10 at 13:13

Arrays can be assigned directly:

int a[3] = {1, 2, 3};

Check the C++ Arrays tutorial, too.

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I don't need initialization after definion of array. I need to init array deeper in the code. –  kirmir Dec 25 '10 at 13:02
1  
@archer: then why can't you define it at the point you need it to be initialized? –  ybungalobill Dec 25 '10 at 13:05
    
This point located in the loop. Maybe im mistaken, but with huge amount of loop executes will be more optimized to define array out of this loop. –  kirmir Dec 25 '10 at 13:08
1  
You can assign it in the same way: a = {1, 2, 3}. But that's actually C++0x ("extended initializer lists"). If you need to reassign the array in each loop iteration, you can still use memcpy. –  AndiDog Dec 25 '10 at 13:11
2  
@archer: then you're almost surely wrong. Array allocation on the stack in just a stack pointer addition/subtraction. The compiler may optimize and allocate it in function's stackframe just like any other variable. –  ybungalobill Dec 25 '10 at 13:27

int a[] = {1,2,3};

this doesn't work for you?

main()
{
    int a[] = {1,3,2};

    printf("%d %d %d\n", a[0], a[1], a[2]);
    printf("Size: %d\n", (sizeof(a) / sizeof(int)));

}

prints:

1 3 2
Size: 3
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No. Syntax error. –  kirmir Dec 25 '10 at 13:01
    
what compiler are you using? –  Ass3mbler Dec 25 '10 at 13:02
    
Microsoft C++ (VS2010). You are using initialization after definition. I need separate. –  kirmir Dec 25 '10 at 13:03
    
main with no return type!? What compiler are you using!? –  ybungalobill Dec 25 '10 at 13:04
    
@ybungalobill: gcc 3.3.5 but the point was not the main but the array use, just put it up quickly :) –  Ass3mbler Dec 25 '10 at 13:08

What about the C99 array initialization?

int array[] = {
   [0] = 5, // array[0] = 5
   [3] = 8, // array[3] = 8
   [255] = 9, // array[255] = 9
};
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Thanks for mentioning this, but we're not discussing initialization :) –  Kos Jan 1 '11 at 22:29
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int arr[3];
    arr[0] = 123, arr[1] = 345, arr[2] = 567;
    printf("%d,%d,%d", arr[0], arr[1], arr[2]);
    return 0;
}
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