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What I want to achieve is very simple: I have a Windows Forms (.NET 3.5) application that uses a path for reading information. This path can be modified by the user, by using the options form I provide.

Now, I want to save the path value to a file for later use. This would be one of the many settings saved to this file. This file would sit directly in the application folder.

I understand three options are available:

  • ConfigurationSettings file (appname.exe.config)
  • Registry
  • Custom XML file

I read that the .NET configuration file is not foreseen for saving values back to it. As for the registry, I would like to get as far away from it as possible.

Does this mean that I should use a custom XML file to save configuration settings? If so, I would like to see code example of that (C#).

I have seen other discussions on this subject, but it is still not clear to me.

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Is this a .NET WinForms application? If so, what version of .NET are you developing on? –  Portman Jan 17 '09 at 13:20
    
Yes, it is a .NET framework version 3.5 WinForms application. –  Fueled Jan 17 '09 at 15:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 250 down vote accepted

If you work with Visual Studio then it is pretty easy to get persistable settings. Right click on the project in Solution Explorer, choose Properties. Select the Settings tab, click on the hyperlink if settings doesn't exist. Use the Settings tab to create application settings. Visual Studio creates the files Settings.settings and Settings.Designer.settings that contain the singleton class Settings inherited from ApplicationSettingsBase. You can access this class from your code to read/write application settings:

Properties.Settings.Default["SomeProperty"] = "Some Value";
Properties.Settings.Default.Save(); // Saves settings in application configuration file

This technique is applicable both for console, Windows Forms and other project types.

Note that you need to set the scope property of your settings. If you select Application scope then Settings.Default.< your property > will be read-only.

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2  
Any reason why you don't use Settings.Default.SomeProperty = "Some value";? –  doekman Nov 7 '11 at 14:19
9  
@doekman Settings.Default.SomeProperty is read only. –  Four Jan 9 '12 at 19:27
1  
@Four: I've got a .NET 4.0 WinApp project here, and my SomeProperty is not readonly. Settings.Default.SomeProperty = 'value'; Settings.Default.Save(); works like a charm. Or is that because I've got User-settings? –  doekman Jan 16 '12 at 10:34
1  
@Four: When I changed a setting from User to Application-scope and save the file, I saw in the generated code the setter disappeared. This also happens with Client profile 4.0 ... –  doekman Jan 17 '12 at 10:28
3  
As of now, with .NET 3.5 it appears you can just use Settings.Default.SomeProperty to assign a value and get strong typecasting. Also, to save others time (took me a while to figure this out), you need to either type Properties.Settings.Default, or add using YourProjectNameSpace.Settings to the top of your file. "Settings" alone is not defined/found. –  eselk Jun 17 '13 at 21:07

The registry is a no-go. You're not sure whether the user which uses your application, has sufficient rights to write to the registry.

You can use the app.config file to save application-level settings (that are the same for each user who uses your application).

I would store user-specific settings in an XML file, which would be saved in Isolated Storage or in the SpecialFolder.ApplicationData directory.

Next to that, as from .NET 2.0, it is possible to store values back to the app.config file.

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23  
Yes. Never use registry if you have a choice. +1 –  Kb. Jan 17 '09 at 14:51
3  
Use the registry, though, if you want per-login/user settings. –  thenonhacker Jan 17 '09 at 15:31
9  
Registry is non-portble –  Kb. Jan 17 '09 at 15:35
5  
@thenonhacker: Or use Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData) –  Nazadus Sep 10 '09 at 14:02
1  
@Kb. Yes, and so is an anonymous struct within a union. Not a good reason not to use it, if you are targetting the Windows platform (from C# no less) –  bobobobo Feb 24 '12 at 16:48

If you are planning on saving to a file within the same directory as your executable, here's a nice solution that uses the JSON format:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

namespace MiscConsole
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MySettings settings = MySettings.Load();
            Console.WriteLine("Current value of 'myInteger': " + settings.myInteger);
            Console.WriteLine("Incrementing 'myInteger'...");
            settings.myInteger++;
            Console.WriteLine("Saving settings...");
            settings.Save();
            Console.WriteLine("Done.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        class MySettings : AppSettings<MySettings>
        {
            public string myString = "Hello World";
            public int myInteger = 1;
        }
    }

    public class AppSettings<T> where T : new()
    {
        private const string DEFAULT_FILENAME = "settings.jsn";

        public void Save(string fileName = DEFAULT_FILENAME)
        {
            File.WriteAllText(fileName, (new JavaScriptSerializer()).Serialize(this));
        }

        public static void Save(T pSettings, string fileName = DEFAULT_FILENAME)
        {
            File.WriteAllText(fileName, (new JavaScriptSerializer()).Serialize(pSettings));
        }

        public static T Load(string fileName = DEFAULT_FILENAME)
        {
            T t = new T();
            if(File.Exists(fileName))
                t = (new JavaScriptSerializer()).Deserialize<T>(File.ReadAllText(fileName));
            return t;
        }
    }
}
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I really like your solution, bro! Thanks to share it! –  Clark Kent Dec 9 '13 at 16:13

The ApplicationSettings class doesn't support saving settings to the app.config file. That's very much by design, apps that run with a properly secured user account (think Vista UAC) do not have write access to the program's installation folder.

You can fight the system with the ConfigurationManager class. But the trivial workaround is to go into the Settings designer and change the setting's scope to User. If that causes hardships (say, the setting is relevant to every user), you should put your Options feature in a separate program so you can ask for the privilege elevation prompt. Or forego using a setting.

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Could you please expand upon your last sentence? Ask for elevation to write app.config or to write a separate application that would go through all users' home folers, look for user.config and edit these? –  CannibalSmith Nov 6 '09 at 13:00
    
The separate program requires a manifest to ask for elevation. Google 'asinvoker requireadministrator' to find the proper syntax. Editing user.config is not practical, nor necessary. –  Hans Passant Nov 6 '09 at 15:19

The registry/configurationSettings/XML argument still seems very active. I've used them all, as the technology has progressed, but my favourite is based on Threed's system combined with Isolated Storage.

The following sample allows storage of an objects named properties to a file in isolated storage. Such as:

AppSettings.Save(myobject, "Prop1,Prop2", "myFile.jsn");

Properties may be recovered using:

AppSettings.Load(myobject, "myFile.jsn");

It is just a sample, not suggestive of best practices.

internal static class AppSettings
{
    internal static void Save(object src, string targ, string fileName)
    {
        Dictionary<string, object> items = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        Type type = src.GetType();

        string[] paramList = targ.Split(new char[] { ',' });
        foreach (string paramName in paramList)
            items.Add(paramName, type.GetProperty(paramName.Trim()).GetValue(src, null));

        try
        {
            // GetUserStoreForApplication doesn't work - can't identify.
            // application unless published by ClickOnce or Silverlight
            IsolatedStorageFile storage = IsolatedStorageFile.GetUserStoreForAssembly();
            using (IsolatedStorageFileStream stream = new IsolatedStorageFileStream(fileName, FileMode.Create, storage))
            using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
            {
                writer.Write((new JavaScriptSerializer()).Serialize(items));
            }

        }
        catch (Exception) { }   // If fails - just don't use preferences
    }

    internal static void Load(object tar, string fileName)
    {
        Dictionary<string, object> items = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        Type type = tar.GetType();

        try
        {
            // GetUserStoreForApplication doesn't work - can't identify
            // application unless published by ClickOnce or Silverlight
            IsolatedStorageFile storage = IsolatedStorageFile.GetUserStoreForAssembly();
            using (IsolatedStorageFileStream stream = new IsolatedStorageFileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open, storage))
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(stream))
            {
                items = (new JavaScriptSerializer()).Deserialize<Dictionary<string, object>>(reader.ReadToEnd());
            }
        }
        catch (Exception) { return; }   // If fails - just don't use preferences.

        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> obj in items)
        {
            try
            {
                tar.GetType().GetProperty(obj.Key).SetValue(tar, obj.Value, null);
            }
            catch (Exception) { }
        }
    }
}
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Or better still; use DataContractJsonSerializer –  Boczek Nov 24 '11 at 16:13

I don't like the proposed solution of using web.config or app.config. Try reading your own XML. Have a look at XML Settings Files – No more web.config.

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As far as I can tell, .NET does support persisting settings using the built-in application settings facility:

The Application Settings feature of Windows Forms makes it easy to create, store, and maintain custom application and user preferences on the client computer. With Windows Forms application settings, you can store not only application data such as database connection strings, but also user-specific data, such as user application preferences. Using Visual Studio or custom managed code, you can create new settings, read them from and write them to disk, bind them to properties on your forms, and validate settings data prior to loading and saving. - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/k4s6c3a0.aspx

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2  
Not true.. see aku's answer above. its possible using Settings and ApplicationSettingsBase –  Gishu Jan 17 '09 at 13:16
    
Ah, I see... My bad –  Jacob Jan 17 '09 at 16:00

Sometimes you want to get rid of those settings kept in the traditional web.config or app.config file. You want more fine grained control over the deployment of your settings entries and separated data design. Or the requirement is to enable adding new entries at runtime.

I can imagine two good options:

  • The strongly typed version and
  • The object oriented version.

The advantage of the strongly typed version are the strongly typed settings names and values. There is no risk of intermixing names or data types. The disadvantage is that more settings have to be coded, cannot be added at runtime.

With the object oriented version the advantage is that new settings can be added at runtime. But you do not have strongly typed names and values. Must be careful with string identifiers. Must know data type saved earlier when getting a value.

You can find the code of both fully functional implementations HERE.

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Please add some more context concerning the implementations. Currently this is a link-only answer. As soon as the link goes offline, your answer loses (almost) all helpfulness. you can find further information in the Stackoverflow Help Section –  Vogel612 Dec 23 '13 at 18:05

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