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i have my own class "SomeObject" with a few members.

now, i have another class "WorkingClass" containg this object as privat member.

My Question is: i want to create a Getter for the "SomeObject", but i don't want anyone to modify it.

which way is better, 1 or 2?

class WorkingClass
{
private:
    SomeObject sObj;

public:
    //... 1)
    const SomeObject &const GetSomeObject()
    {
        return mousePosition;
    }

    //... 2)
    const SomeObject *const GetSomeObject()
    {
        return &mouseMovement;
    }
}

i know you can always cast away const, but still, i'm just trying to get my code clean and fail-safe

EDIT:

then i have a further question. when i have a smart-pointer member and use it a lot inside the class, and then suddenly want someone to have acces to read some values but nothing more, would this be a good solution or is that verbose again?

class X
{
private:
    boost::shared_ptr<SomeObject> sob

public:
    const const & GetSomeObject()
    {
        return *sob.get();
    }
}

and how about returning a "const boost::shared_ptr<...> GetX()" ? it may not be really neccessary, but still not useless, as the compiler would forbid GetX().reset(..) in such a case, and without the const boost::... declaration this useless operation would be permitted. or am i wrong?

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1  
why not returning by value ? –  6502 Dec 25 '10 at 23:12
    
well because someobject is a pretty big class. i just want to pass it back to have some values accessible to get for others –  cppanda Dec 25 '10 at 23:15
    
Returning objects by value is usually safe, as every modern compiler implements RVO and NRVO. Worrying about this is a premature optimization. :) –  jalf Dec 26 '10 at 9:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Neither is good:

  • const SomeObject &const is ill-formed. You cannot const-qualify a reference. (You can, of course, qualify the referent type.)

  • const SomeObject *const is unnecessarily verbose. A function call expression o.GetSomeObject() is an rvalue expression and only class-type rvalues can be const-qualified. You may as well just say const SomeObject*. (const SomeObject *const can actually lead to issues with template instantiation, though such issues are rare.)

As for whether you choose to return by pointer or by reference, it depends on how you are using the return value. Both can make sense in different circumstances. Regardless, you want to return a reference or pointer to a const object, not a const reference or a const pointer:

const SomeObject& GetSomeObject() { ... }
const SomeObject* GetSomeObject() { ... }

Usually, returning a reference is preferable.

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thanks. could you give 2 examples of which to use when? –  cppanda Dec 25 '10 at 23:11
1  
@cppanda: If you don't need a pointer, use a reference. It is rare that a pointer is needed. –  James McNellis Dec 25 '10 at 23:20
    
thanks, that helped a lot. solved –  cppanda Dec 25 '10 at 23:27
    
Every reference is constant reference. So const SomeObject &const is the same as const SomeObject &. IMO it's better to return by reference. –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 25 '10 at 23:31
    
then i have a further question. when i have a smart-pointer member and use it a lot inside the class, and then suddenly want someone to have acces to read some values but nothing more, would this be a good solution or is that verbose again? class X { private: boost::shared_ptr<SomeObject> sob public: const const & GetSomeObject() { return *sob.get(); } } –  cppanda Dec 25 '10 at 23:44

Writing & const is pointless. References are always constant. Omit the const keyword there.

Using a reference is better if you want to return a constant non-null object. If you want to return either an object or a null pointer then use a pointer instead.

See also When should I use references, and when should I use pointers?

Use references when you can, and pointers when you have to.

References are usually preferred over pointers whenever you don't need "reseating". This usually means that references are most useful in a class's public interface. References typically appear on the skin of an object, and pointers on the inside.

The exception to the above is where a function's parameter or return value needs a "sentinel" reference — a reference that does not refer to an object. This is usually best done by returning/taking a pointer, and giving the NULL pointer this special significance (references should always alias objects, not a dereferenced NULL pointer).

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