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As of right now I'm using this code below to download files to get there source code:

    NSString *stringUrl = @"http://example.com/hello/goodbye.html";
NSURL *finalURL = [NSURL URLWithString:[stringUrl stringByAddingPercentEscapesUsingEncoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding]];
self.source = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:finalURL encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil];

Don't get me wrong, it works great but it doesn't work at all if the url doesn't have an extension like so:

NSString *stringUrl = @"http://example2.com/something/";
NSURL *finalURL = [NSURL URLWithString:[stringUrl stringByAddingPercentEscapesUsingEncoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding]];
self.source = [NSString stringWithContentsOfURL:finalURL encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil];

How would I get the html source code of something that the extension isn't defined? Hopefully someone can help me with this because my whole project relies on getting the source from url's with no extension. Thanks

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What exactly doesn't work? –  Jacob Relkin Dec 26 '10 at 4:16
    
If I try to download the source of let's say for instance "h++p://example2.com/something/" Since it doesn't have a .html extension, I can't download the source of it. It could be a php ext but shouldn't it still get the html source of it? It works on some urls without an extension but I'm guessing because it has a index.html in the directory. –  0SX Dec 26 '10 at 4:21
    
Err.. how are you not downloading the source of the page? After all, the browser needs the source of the page in order to render it. –  Billy ONeal Dec 26 '10 at 4:23
    
I'm not firmiliar with UIWebView, and I don't see any UIWebView code in what you've posted. I am, however, firmiliar with the HTTP spec and how webservers work in general. If you're having problems with a specific Apple Objective-C API, then you should show the code for that, not the place where you're building the URL. –  Billy ONeal Dec 26 '10 at 4:28
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It should work just as if there was a file defined. The GET url is merely a request to the webserver. The server is allowed to return whatever content of the "file" it wants to.

In other words: the complexity of handling the strange URLs like that need not be a part of your downloading code (so long as you process redirect requests). That's complexity for the server-side.

EDIT:

If you're trying to get the PHP source of the page (or whatever server-side language the web application is written in), you are outta luck. All of that code is processed server side and is never sent to the client at all.

EDIT2:

If you're trying to turn something like http://example2.com/something/ into http://example2.com/something/whatever-file-the-webserver-used.XXX, then you are also out of luck. Nobody ever said the webserver ever had to hand that off to a file at all -- again, the URL just gets turned into a GET request to the server. The server is free to generate the response however it wishes, and it need not even consult a specific filesystem file to generate the result (it could be generated completely in memory by the webserver itself, and never touch the filesystem at all). The system need not even know the concept of a file and still be able to implement HTTP itself just fine.

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Thanks for the explanation, I'll have to find a workaround. Thanks again. –  0SX Dec 26 '10 at 4:32
    
@0SX: You're welcome. Based upon my quick 1 minute google of Apple's developer area, perhaps you want NSURLRequest instead? –  Billy ONeal Dec 26 '10 at 4:37
    
@0SX: Also, this might be useful -- there's also an entire Communicating with HTTP Servers article that talks about doing what you want -- you shouldn't need to piggyback on top of UI in order to do a simple HTTP request. –  Billy ONeal Dec 26 '10 at 4:40
    
Wow!!! Thanks Billy, I'll give those docs a look through. –  0SX Dec 26 '10 at 4:57
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