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int i;
int data[5] = {0};
data[0] = i;

What's the value in data[0]?

Also, what's the meaning of this line?

if (!data[0]) { ... }
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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In most cases, there is no "default" value for an int object.

If you declare int i; as a (non-static) local variable inside of a function, it has an indeterminate value. It is uninitialized and you can't use it until you write a valid value to it.

It's a good habit to get into to explicitly initialize any object when you declare it.

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@James McNellis, You meant "int type", not int object, right? :) –  Jacob Relkin Dec 26 '10 at 5:44
3  
@Jacob: Types don't have values. Objects have values. An object that is not explicitly initialized might have some default value in some languages (or even in C, in certain circumstances). –  James McNellis Dec 26 '10 at 5:46
1  
@Jacob: Because that's the result you happened to get when you compiled the program with your compiler with certain settings at a particular time. When I compile and run that program, I get an output of -858993460-858993460-858993460-858993460-858993460. It's likely that your compiler is zero-initializing memory for you. Mine, Visual C++ with standard debug build settings, is pre-initializing uninitialized objects with 0xcc so that they are more easily detected. –  James McNellis Dec 26 '10 at 5:48
1  
@Jacob You got lucky, or your compiler implements a default value of zero. But the ANSI C spec does not specify a default value for non-static data members. And I've never seen a compiler spec define it that way either. –  boiler96 Dec 26 '10 at 5:49
4  
@Jacob: An "object" in both C and C++ is just "a region of storage." It's a sequence of bytes that represent something. –  James McNellis Dec 26 '10 at 5:50

It depends on where the code is written. Consider:

int i;
int data[5] = {0};

void func1(void)
{
    data[0] = i;
}

void func2(void)
{
    int i;
    int data[5] = {0};
    data[0] = i;
    ...
}

The value assigned to data[0] in func1() is completely deterministic; it must be zero (assuming no other assignments have interfered with the values of the global variables i and data).

By contrast, the value set in func2() is completely indeterminate; you cannot reliably state what value will be assigned to data[0] because no value has been reliably assigned to i in the function. It will likely be a value that was on the stack from some previous function call, but that depends on both the compiler and the program and is not even 'implementation defined'; it is pure undefined behaviour.

You also ask "What is the meaning of this?"

if (!data[0]) { ... }

The '!' operator does a logical inversion of the value it is applied to: it maps zero to one, and maps any non-zero value to zero. The overall condition evaluates to true if the expression evaluates to a non-zero value. So, if data[0] is 0, !data[0] maps to 1 and the code in the block is executed; if data[0] is not 0, !data[0] maps to 0 and the code in the block is not executed.

It is a commonly used idiom because it is more succinct than the alternative:

if (data[0] == 0) { ... }
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thanks. i really appreciate your answer. –  mnaim86 Dec 26 '10 at 6:15
    
I really don't get why you say the value being assigned to data[0] in func1 is fully deterministic.. it seems 100% indeterminate as long as i has not been initialized –  Julius Jun 30 '14 at 21:19
    
@Julius: In the context of func1(), i is a global variable and global (int) variables are initialized to 0 unless there is some other initializer specified. (The story is slightly more complex for some other types, but all global variables are initialized, either to a specified value or to 'zero'.) Now, if some other code has modified the value of i, then the value assigned to data[0] will not necessarily be 0, but the value is still defined and not indeterminate. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 30 '14 at 21:25

If an integer is not initialized, its value is undefined as per C

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Since you've included the ={0};, the entire array is filled with zeros. If this is defined outside any function, it would be initialized with zeros even without the initializer. if (!data[x]) is equivalent to if (data[x] == 0).

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2  
data[0] is subsequently set to i. The OP boils down to asking about what the value of i is, since it hasn't been assigned one. –  cHao Dec 26 '10 at 5:55
    
thanks. i really appreciate your answer. –  mnaim86 Dec 26 '10 at 6:14

// File 'a.c'

   #include <stdio.h> 

   void main()
    {
            int i, j , k;
            printf("i = %i j = %i k = %i\n", i, j, k);
    }

// test results

> $ gcc a.c 
> $ ./a.out 
> i = 32767 j = 0 k = 0
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if an integer is declared globally then it is initialized automatically with zero but if it is local then contains garbage value until and unless itis given some value

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