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I tried to understand the statement:

    int main() {
        fstream inf( "ex.txt", ios::in );
        char c;
        while( inf >> c ) {
            cout << c << ", ";
        }
        return 0;
    }

What does ( inf >> c ) return in the while loop above? I downloaded the gcc source code and tried to play around with it but it was way too complex for me :( .

I checked the C++ reference page, I realized that it return a reference to itself:

    istream& operator>> (bool& val );
    istream& operator>> (short& val );
    istream& operator>> (unsigned short& val );
    istream& operator>> (int& val );
    istream& operator>> (unsigned int& val );
    istream& operator>> (long& val );
    istream& operator>> (unsigned long& val );
    istream& operator>> (float& val );
    istream& operator>> (double& val );
    istream& operator>> (long double& val );
    istream& operator>> (void*& val );

    istream& operator>> (streambuf* sb );

    istream& operator>> (istream& ( *pf )(istream&));
    istream& operator>> (ios& ( *pf )(ios&));
    istream& operator>> (ios_base& ( *pf )(ios_base&));

    *** the following functions are not members but GLOBAL functions:

    istream& operator>> (istream& is, char& ch );
    istream& operator>> (istream& is, signed char& ch );
    istream& operator>> (istream& is, unsigned char& ch );

    istream& operator>> (istream& is, char* str );
    istream& operator>> (istream& is, signed char* str );
    istream& operator>> (istream& is, unsigned char* str );

So I created a similar class, let's say my_istream:

struct my_istream {
    my_istream& self_ref;
};

int main() {
    my_istream mis;
}

when compiling, I got this error:

1>c:\users\chan\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\topcoder\topcoder\main.cpp(26): error C2758: 'my_istream::self_ref' : must be initialized in constructor base/member initializer list

However, I don't really know what should self_ref be initialized to in this case? I understand a pointer to itself when dealing with linked-list, and I understand that reference( & ) in C++ is just a disguised form of pointer in C. But I can't explain this situation? How does the internal implementation of istream actually work? How does a reference can be evaluated as true or false? Thanks!

EDIT:

struct my_istream {
    my_istream() {
    }

    my_istream& operator >>( int x ) {
        return *this;
    }
};

int main() {
    my_istream mis;
    int x;
    while( mis.operator>>( x ) ) {
        cout << "--";
    }
}

What should I add to my_istream class in order to work inside the while loop?

share|improve this question
    
@RBerteig: Thanks for editing! –  Chan Dec 26 '10 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To return a self ref you just return *this. You don't actually declare an internal self reference. You can have reference members, but you must initialize them in the constructor initializer list: class Foo { Foo(int& some_int_ref) :my_ref_member(some_int_ref)

istream has another overload to determine its boolean value.

Example of a chainable member (like operator >>, but in this case just an ordinary function) and giving a class a boolean value (although the latter is a complex subject worthy of its own subject):

#include <iostream>

class X {
    bool B;
public:
    X() :B(false) { }
    X& toggle() { B = !B; return *this; }
    operator void*() { return B ? this : 0; }
};

int main()
{
    X x;

    x.toggle().toggle().toggle();
    if (x)
        std::cout << "true!" << std::endl;
}

EDIT: I didn't want to delve into operator bool vs operator void * in this answer, but this old stackoverflow question should give you good references: Why is "operator bool()" invoked when I cast to "long"?

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for clear explanation. So if I want to implement a similar technique like istream class, what should I provide in my class? –  Chan Dec 26 '10 at 8:37

What does ( inf >> c ) return in the while loop above?

void*. The loop test resolves to while (inf.operator void*() != NULL).

How does a reference can be evaluated as true or false?

But supporting conversion to bool or something convertible to bool.

How does the internal implementation of istream actually work?

It just returns a reference to itself (return *this) so it can support chaining.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! So I have to provide the void*() operator in order to put that statement inside the while loop ? –  Chan Dec 26 '10 at 8:36
    
You needn't call it explicitly (as you've already seen). It's a conversion operator. C++ calls it automatically here because it finds the object being used in a boolean context. If there was an operator bool it would call that instead, but there isn't, so it calls operator void* which is convertible to bool. It's good to understand this stuff because it can seriously bite you in the ass. :) –  Mud Dec 26 '10 at 8:40
    
Thanks Mud, I got it ;) –  Chan Dec 26 '10 at 8:54

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