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Please consider the following code snippet:

jQuery(function ()
{
    drawLogo(); 
});

function drawLogo()
{
    var paper = Raphael('logo', 100, 100);//creates canvas width=height=100px
    var rect = paper.rect(1,1,98,98, 10);//chessboard background
    rect.attr("fill","#efd5a4");
    var circle1 = paper.circle(20,20,12);
    var circle2 = paper.circle(50,20,12);
    var circle3 = paper.circle(80,20,12);
    var circle4 = paper.circle(20,50,12);
    var circle5 = paper.circle(50,50,12);
    var circle6 = paper.circle(80,50,12);
    var circle7 = paper.circle(20,80,12);
    var circle8 = paper.circle(50,80,12);
    var circle9 = paper.circle(80,80,12);
    paper.path("M35,0 L35,100");
    paper.path("M65,0 L65,100");
    paper.path("M0,35 L100,35");
    paper.path("M0,65 L100,65");

    circle1.animate({scale:"0"}, 2000);
    //setTimeout(circle1.animate({scale:"1"}, 2000), 2000);

}

The animation I'd like to achieve is a chain of two parts, first, a vertical scale animation from 100% to 0%, second, a vertical scale animation from 0% to 100%. The above code scales down both vertically and horizontally, so it is incorrect.

I've check Raphael's documentation but couldn't get it, particularly because I cannot see the correct syntax... Any good API reference like that of jQuery's?

Also, if I make the following change, then Firefox shows an error saying too many recursions:

transform(circle1);
function transform(item)
{
    item.animate({scale:"0"}, 2000, transform(item));
}

I know this is bad, but what is the correct way to get a infinite "loop" of animation?

Edit: I modified the code to the following

transform([circle1, circle3, circle5, circle7, circle9]);
function transform(elements)
{
    for(var e in elements)
    {
        e.animate({scale:"0"}, 2000);
    }
}

in the hope that this would at least run the first part of animation for 5 circles, but unfortunately, it only gives an error saying e.animate() is not a function. Probably the reason is that when elements are retrieved back from the array, it "loses its type"? (just like in Java when you get an elements from plain old ArrayList, you must explicitly downcast or everything will be just of type object.)

2nd Edit before going to bed At least the following works for once!

var elements = [circle1, circle3, circle5, circle7, circle9];
for(var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++)
    transform(elements[i]);
function transform(e)
{
    e.animate({scale: 0},2000, function(){this.animate({scale:1},
    2000, transform(this));});  
}

Achieved parts: chained two scaling animations one after another, for five circles; Failed parts: Still not an infinite loop, still not only vertical scale.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. It seems scaling of circle in just one direction is not possible. Instead use an ellipse. The scale attribute takes a string like "1 0" which means scale 100% for x (horizontally) and 0% for y (vertically). See attr-scale

So your animation can be achieved by

ellipse.animate({"50%": {scale: "1 0"}, "100%": {scale: "1 1"}}, 2000);

see 3rd method (keyframes) in animate

which means at 50% of animation the ellipse should be scaled 0% vertically and at 100% animation scale it back to 100%.

  1. When you call a function, it will be evaluated immediately. Your transform calls transform(item) again before passing it to animate. Instead you should wrap it in a function and pass it.

Here's the full source

jQuery(function ()
{
    drawLogo();
});

function drawLogo()
{
    var paper = Raphael('logo', 100, 100);//creates canvas width=height=100px
    var rect = paper.rect(1,1,98,98, 10);//chessboard background
    rect.attr("fill","#efd5a4");
    var ellipse1 = paper.ellipse(20,20,12, 12);
    var ellipse2 = paper.ellipse(50,20,12, 12);
    var ellipse3 = paper.ellipse(80,20,12, 12);
    var ellipse4 = paper.ellipse(20,50,12, 12);
    var ellipse5 = paper.ellipse(50,50,12, 12);
    var ellipse6 = paper.ellipse(80,50,12, 12);
    var ellipse7 = paper.ellipse(20,80,12, 12);
    var ellipse8 = paper.ellipse(50,80,12, 12);
    var ellipse9 = paper.ellipse(80,80,12, 12);
    paper.path("M35,0 L35,100");
    paper.path("M65,0 L65,100");
    paper.path("M0,35 L100,35");
    paper.path("M0,65 L100,65");

    var elements = [ellipse1, ellipse3, ellipse5, ellipse7, ellipse9];
    for(var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++)
        transform(elements[i]); 

}

function transform(e)
{
    e.animate({
                  "50%": {scale: "1 0"},
                  "100%": {scale: "1 1", callback: function() {transform(e);}}
              }, 2000);
}
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In Raphael 2.0+, the scale animation has changed a bit: ellipse.animate({"50%": {transform: "s1.1 1.1"}, "100%": {transform: "s1 1"}}, 400); –  TimDog Feb 28 '12 at 4:58
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