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I find it funny that Java (or the java.util library) does not have a built-in function to calculate difference in dates. What is the best way to do this? I know the simple way is to take the difference of the time in milliseconds and then convert that into days. However, i wanted to know if this works in all cases (with daylight saving, etc.).

Thanks, Anirudh

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See xmission.com/~goodhill/dates/deltaDates.html for some background. –  Brian Clapper Jan 17 '09 at 15:24
    
That's a nice article. Thanks! –  Anirudh Jan 18 '09 at 8:43
    
@Anirudh Search StackOverflow for "joda" and term such as "span", "Interval", "Duration", "Period". You will find many examples with discussion. –  Basil Bourque Mar 19 at 17:13
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I know the simple way is to take the difference of the time in milliseconds and then convert that into days. However, i wanted to know if this works in all cases (with daylight saving, etc.).

If your times are derived from UTC dates, or they are just the difference between two calls to System.getCurrentTimeMillis() measured on the same system, you will get a valid number of milliseconds as the difference, independent of any timezone issues. (which is why everything should be using UTC as a storage format -- it's much easier to go from UTC->local time; if you try to go the other way then you need to store the local timezone along with the local time -- or attempt to infer it, gack!)

As for turning this into a number of days, you should just be able to divide by 86400000... with the caveat that there is an occasional leap second every other year or so.

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Java's not missing much, if you look at open source: try Joda-Time.

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question about Java date ==> answer mentions Joda! –  Steve McLeod Jan 17 '09 at 14:57
    
Yes, that's the way it works when a language has 2 defect date/time classes. –  krosenvold Jan 17 '09 at 14:59
    
I looked at Joda - unfortunately, i am not allowed to use non-standard libraries :( –  Anirudh Jan 18 '09 at 8:42
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I think Joda's pretty much standard nowadays :-) –  mikera Apr 7 '11 at 15:27
    
Indeed, Joda-Time's offspring (the java.time package) is now an official part of Java as of yesterday, bundled with the release of Java 8. –  Basil Bourque Mar 19 at 17:12
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With the date4j library:

int numDaysBetween = oneDate.numDaysFrom(anotherDate);
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I disagree with the claim that Java doesn't have a mechanism for calculating the difference between dates.

Java was designed for global use. It was designed so that there isn't a concept of date, there is only a concept of "time in milliseconds". Any interpretation of such a universal time as the time-and-date in a specific location under a specific convention is merely a projection or a view.

The calendar class is used to turn this sort of absolute time into dates. You can also add or subtract date components, if you really need to. The only way to provide a difference in term of components between two times would be Calendar generated and specific. Thus, you could argue that the standard library does not include a smart enough Gregorian Calendar, and I would agree that it leaves some to be desired.

That being said, there are numerous implementations of this kind of functionality, I see others have provided examples.

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I agree with you in principle. My claim of Java not having this functionality was based on the fact that other languages (Ruby, Python, etc) have a very simple (and working) implementation of adding and subtracting dates as part of the standard Date classes. –  Anirudh Jan 20 '09 at 16:31
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There is simple way to implement it. We can use Calendar.add method with loop. For example as below,

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");

Date beginDate = dateFormat.parse("2013-11-29");
Date endDate = dateFormat.parse("2013-12-4");

Calendar beginCalendar = Calendar.getInstance();
beginCalendar.setTime(beginDate);

Calendar endCalendar = Calendar.getInstance();
beginCalendar.setTime(endDate);

The minus days between beginDate and endDate, and the code as below,

int minusDays = 0;
while (true) {
  minusDays++;

  // Day increasing by 1
  beginCalendar.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);

  if (dateFormat.format(beginCalendar.getTime()).
            equals(dateFormat.format(endCalendar).getTime())) {
    break;
  }
}
System.out.println("The substractation between two days is " + (minusDays + 1));

Have Fun! @.@

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I've used this method before. However, it's runtime is O(N), where N is the number of days between beginDate, and endDate. I suspect using JodaTime will give better results. –  jharig23 Dec 4 '13 at 12:40
    
Yep, you are right. BUT I think O(n) is acceptable for some projects. Because I don't wanna import some lib. Still thanks for your suggestions. –  Luna Kong Dec 26 '13 at 7:10
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Java's implementation of dates is poor. If you find Joda-Time too complicated, try my little contribution to open source: http://calendardate.sourceforge.net/javadoc/index.html

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