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This is a method I tried to run:

function SayHello() {
    cars = new Array();
    cars[0] = "Toyota";
    cars[1] = "Mitsubishi";
    cars[2] = "Honda";

    for (car in cars) {
        alert(car);
    }
}

This returned:

0
1
2

When I changed the code to this:

function SayHello() {
    cars = new Array();
    cars[0] = "Toyota";
    cars[1] = "Mitsubishi";
    cars[2] = "Honda";

    for (car in cars) {
        alert(cars[car]);
    }
}

It returned the names correctly.

My question is, does the for-in loop just return an index in an orderly fashion? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The simple answer is: The for-in return the name of the properties of the object you are iterating. In this case, when you say cars[0] = instead of cars.push(...) you are creating a property which name is 0. To iterate through the values you would need a for(var i=0;i<cars.length;i++) alert(cars[i]); – andrerpena Dec 26 '10 at 18:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it will be the index within the collections.

See here:

var mycars = ["Saab", "Volvo", "BMW"];

for (var car in mycars)
{
  document.write(mycars[car] + "<br />");
}

As you can see, the use of the variable as an index into the collection.

You can use for each ... in syntax (introduced in Javascript 1.6) that will iterate over values. See here.

for each...in - similar to for...in, but iterates over the values of object's properties, rather than the property names themselves. (New in JavaScript 1.6.)

As far as I know, Javascript 1.6+ is only used in Firefox at this time.

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I know, 'for each' is Firefox only ... – KooiInc Dec 26 '10 at 17:32
    
Bad answer... 1. var x at the top is stupid in JS 2. use ["Saab", "Volvo", "BMW"] for creating an Array, the Array constructor should be avoided (take a look at what parameters it takes) 3. The usual missing hasOwnProperty in the for...in – Ivo Wetzel Dec 26 '10 at 17:38
    
@Koolinc - IE 9 should too. – Oded Dec 26 '10 at 17:40
    
@Oded Which only further undermines the credibility of this answer - when did W3School become the leading authority on learning JavaScript? – Yi Jiang Dec 26 '10 at 17:45
    
@Oded Oh sorry, missed point 4. Link to w3schools. That alone is worth a down vote from everyone here :/ – Ivo Wetzel Dec 26 '10 at 17:45

Yes, the value of the iterator is the name of the property. It's highly frowned upon to use it to loop over arrays, however. For example, consider this:

x = ['a', 'b', 'c'];

x.foo = 'bar';

for (i in x) alert(i);  // 0, 1, 2, foo

It's intended for iterating over the members of an object:

x = { a : 'apple', b : 'banana', c : 'carrot' };

for (i in x) {
    // and it's best to check that the property actually exists
    // on this object, not just on one of its prototypal ancestors:
    if (x.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
        alert(i);  // 'a', 'b', 'c'
    }
}

More information about why on the YUI Blog

share|improve this answer

Yes and no. It returns indexes, not the values, and it returns them as quoted strings. "0", "1", etc..

The plus side of this is that for in works the same if you use a javascript object as associative array.

share|improve this answer

It returns the "key" of each item. Same result will be achieved with such "array":

cars = {0: "Toyota", 1: "Mitsubishi", 2: "Honda"};
share|improve this answer

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