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Please help me find a good solution for this problem.

We have n boxes with 3 dimensions. We can orient them and we want to put them on top of another to have a maximun height. We can put a box on top of an other box, if 2 dimensions (width and lenght) are lower than the dimensions of the box below.

For exapmle we have 3 dimensions w*D*h, we can show it in to (h*d,d*h,w*d,d*W,h*w,w*h) please help me to solve it in graph theory. in this problem we can not put(2*3)above(2*4) because it has the same width.so the 2 dimension shoud be smaller than the box

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is there any specific reason to solve it with graph theory? – TalentTuner Dec 26 '10 at 18:48
1  
Please help you solve what? You've said how you can stack boxes, but you haven't stated the question. – marcog Dec 26 '10 at 18:51
    
@Saurabh because he probably needs to show that this is NP-complete. I'm thinking homework tag. – MK. Dec 26 '10 at 18:52
    
This problem has been posed before: stackoverflow.com/questions/4511086/box-stacking-problem (the current top-voted answer is, I think, incorrect, because it clones the boxes) and earlier stackoverflow.com/questions/2329492/box-stacking-problem/… (the currently accepted answer is simply wrong; a comment gives a counterexample). – Jason Orendorff Dec 27 '10 at 15:12

Edit: Only works if boxes can not be rotated about all axes.

If I understand the question correctly, it can be solved by dynamic programming. A simple algorithm finding the height of the maximum stack is:

Start by rotating all boxes such that for Box B_i, w_i <= d_i. This takes time O(n).

Now sort the boxes according to bottom area w_i * d_i and let the indexing show this. This takes time O(n log n).

Now B_i can be put onto B_j only if i < j, but i < j does not imply that B_i can be on B_j.

The largest stack with B_j on top is either

  • B_j on the ground
  • A stack made of the first j-1 boxes, with B_j on top.

Now we can create a recursive formula for computing the height of the maximum stack

H(j) = max (h_j, max (H(i)|i < j, d_i < d_j, w_i < w_j) + h_j)

and by computing max (H(j),i <= j <= n) we get the height of the maximum stack.

If we want the actual stack, we can attach some information to the H function and remember the indices.

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i think you are missing the important fact that box can be rotated arbitrary so that width can become height and vice versa. – MK. Dec 26 '10 at 23:55
    
@MK: You are absolutely correct, I missed that. – utdiscant Dec 27 '10 at 12:46
    
@utdiscant A small correction to ur formula H(j) = max (h_j, max (H(i)|i < j, d_i < d_j, w_i < w_j) + h_j -h_j') where h_j' is the height of the box j previously used to compute heights till i – Nandish A Mar 8 '13 at 18:27

UPDATED (correct? but possibly not the most efficient):

Each box becomes 3 vertices (call these vertices related). Get a weighted DAG. Modify the algorithm described here Sort topologically (ignoring the fact that some vertices are related), follow the algorithm but instead of array of integers keep a list of the paths that lead to each vertex. Then when adding paths for a new vertex ('w' in wiki alg) make a list of paths that lead there by dropping the paths to v that contain a vertex related to w. Unlike the original algorithm, this one is exponential.

ORIGINAL WRONG ANSWER (see comments):

Each box becomes 3 nodes for its 3 surface sizes. Then create a directed graph connecting each surface to all surfaces of smaller sizes. Assign price to each edge to be equal to the 3rd dimension of the node (i.e. height) that the edge leads to. Now this is the problem of finding the longest path problem in a DAG.

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Not quite, because if you use one node then two others are excluded. – Keith Randall Dec 26 '10 at 21:52
    
@Keith Randall excellent point! So don't split boxes into 3 nodes. Since we are assigning weights to edges, not nodes, the edge weight is just maximum height achievable from the source node going to the destination node. So going to node X from nodes A and B might have higher weight for A if A is bigger than B. So then it is still the longest path in DAG solvable in polynomial time. – MK. Dec 26 '10 at 22:22
    
@Keith Randall no, never mind, that doesn't work either because the weight would depend on how we got to the nodes A and B. Damn, so close! – MK. Dec 26 '10 at 22:31
    
I don't think that works either. So each node is a box that could be in any of 3 orientations. There is no constraint that the orientation of the box using the inbound edge is the same as the orientation of the box using the outbound edge. Your edge in could assume that the box is tall and thin, and your edge out assumes the box is wide and short. – Keith Randall Dec 26 '10 at 22:32
    
@Keith Randall hey how about this. Go back to splitting into 3 vertices (call them "related"). Sort topologically (ignoring the fact that some nodes are related), and run the dynamic programming algorithm (as described en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…) but instead of array of integers keep a list of the paths that lead to each vertex. Then when adding generating paths for a new vertex ('w' in wiki alg) make a list of paths that lead there by dropping the paths to v that contain a vertex related to w. This will no longer by polynomial time.. – MK. Dec 27 '10 at 2:59

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