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I've used git-blame to find a particular commit. Now I want to find the branch that it originally came from. (From there, I'll use the branch name to find the particular ticket)

Let's define "original branch" as "the branch to which the commit was made before the branch was merged into any other branch".

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6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Like the others said, if the branch you are looking for isn't local to the repository on which you are blaming this commit (e.g. a branch only in the personal repo of a distant developer), you are screwed.

But assuming that sought-after branch is something you can see, and that of course you have the commit's hash, say d590f2..., a partial answer is that you can do :

$ git branch --contains d590f2
  tests
* master

Then, just to confirm you have the culprit:

$ git rev-list tests | grep d590f2

Of course, if d590f2 has been merged in more than one branch, you will have to be more subtle than this.

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That isn't really applicable in git. Branches are local concepts to each repository: one person's "local-stuff" branch can be quite separate from another person's "local-stuff" branch. If you do something like looking at your main integration branch, and your query commit, and removing all the merge bases between the two, you should be able to get a subtree of the commit history that may shed some illumination... or may not. e.g. if you trace up the link from the query commit towards "master" you should hopefully find merge commits with useful comments saying where the merge came from... but this information is just informational, not recorded in some way intended to be automatically retrieved.

e.g. gitk some-commit...master (which is almost short for gitk some-commit master --not $(git merge-base some-commit master))

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A Git branch is nothing else than a "named pointer to a commit" (that's a fundamental different concept than in other well-known VCS).

This situation is clear, commit A is on branch-1, commit B on branch-2:

  o A [branch-1]
  |
o | B [branch-2]
| |

After merging is becomes unclear whether A (or B) originally was on branch-1 or branch-2:

o [branch-1] [branch-2]
|
o merged 
|\
| o A
| |
o | B
| |

Maybe you can guess on what Git branch the commit A was if you have tagged parent commits of A, e.g. release-1 and you know that this tag only was given for commits in branch-1.

o [branch-1] [branch-2]
|
o merged 
|\
| o A
| |
o | B
| |
| o <release-1]
| |
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Strictly speaking, only impossible if the merge is fast forwarded. If all merges are done with --no-ff then git preserves branch history as well. Just do git log --graph $commit_id .. HEAD –  slebetman Dec 27 '10 at 0:11
5  
Generally speaking, in Git, commits aren't on branches, branches are on commits. –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 27 '10 at 3:47

I give a try, please comment since not totally sure, but I believe it does the job.

The following will work only if the branches still point at the tip of before being merged into master, which is the case if the branches were on the same repo:

o [master]
|
o merged branch "great-feature" into master
|\
| o A [great-feature]
| |
o | B
| |

If it it not the case (for example if you pulled from another repo) you can still recreate them by hand.

First get the branches where your commit are:

$ git branch -a --contains=<sha-of-B>
*master
great-feature

then for each branch get the number of commits that separate their head to the commit: this is the number of lines that output git log for the specified range:

$ git log --pretty=oneline <sha-of-B>..great-feature | wc -l
1
$ git log --pretty=oneline <sha-of-B>..master | wc -l
4

So B is nearest to great-feature, which means it was created in it.

This could be made into a nice script, feel free to add it to the answer (I'm not good at this)

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I found a simpler way to do it: it's in the message of the last commit of git log <sha>..HEAD --merges!

This command shows the merges that have happened between master and the commit; the last commit output by this command is the first merge commit that included it. It usually contains the branch name, so even if the branch was deleted you can find its name.

To get only the name of the branch just type git log <sha>..HEAD --merges --oneline |tail -1

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1  
This is only applicable in cases where there wasn't a fast-forward merge. –  meagar Jul 14 '11 at 19:51
    
@meagar agree, on a side note merging a feature into master with fast-forward is not a good practice, for this precise reason: it's nicer to see in the history that a feature has been merged –  CharlesB Jul 15 '11 at 8:53

First ensure you fetched changes from remotes

$ git fetch --all

And,

$ git branch -a --contains d590f2

Without -a option you can't find commits existing only on remote branches

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