Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using ADO.NET to connect to an Oracle DB through ODBC. Everything is working fine, besides binding parameters with a simple SQL query:

Connection.Open();
IDbCommand command = Connection.CreateCommand();
command.CommandText = "SELECT length FROM activity_type WHERE name = :name_of_activity";
var parameter = command.CreateParameter();
parameter.ParameterName = ":name_of_activity";
parameter.Value = "Short_break";
command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
int result = Convert.ToInt32(command.ExecuteScalar());
Connection.Close();

It always returns 0 results (a null from ExecuteScalar() - the same from a reader). But if I'd put a straightforward SQL query like this: command.CommandText = "SELECT length FROM activity_type WHERE name = 'Short_break'" it would work like a charm. Whats more, I used similar constructions all over the code for INSERT INTO clauses, and they were OK.

Am I missing something?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the docs for OdbcCommand.Parameters:

When CommandType is set to Text, the .NET Framework Data Provider for ODBC does not support passing named parameters to an SQL statement or to a stored procedure called by an OdbcCommand. In either of these cases, use the question mark (?) placeholder. For example:

SELECT * FROM Customers WHERE CustomerID = ?

In other words, your code should look like this:

Connection.Open();
IDbCommand command = Connection.CreateCommand();
command.CommandText = "SELECT length FROM activity_type WHERE name = ?";
var parameter = command.CreateParameter();
parameter.Value = "Short_break";
command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
int result = Convert.ToInt32(command.ExecuteScalar());
Connection.Close();

(You should probably be considering using using statements, mind you... otherwise if this throws an exception, you won't be closing the connection.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. I've tried the '?' placeholder before, with no luck. Still the same result. Named parameters work in every other part of the code. I've extracted the code from the project, originally Connection.Close() is in a finally clause. –  mcmil Dec 26 '10 at 20:54
    
@M_F: Is this genuinely an OdbcCommand? It's hard to tell from the fairly generic code given. Unfortunately different providers support different forms of parameterized queries. Have you tried looking at your database logs to see what's getting through? –  Jon Skeet Dec 26 '10 at 21:00
    
Yes it is an OdbcCommand. Connection is created as a IdbConnection Connection = new OdbcConnection("DSN=oracle; UID=xxx; PWD=xxx");. I try to get to the logs, thanks. –  mcmil Dec 26 '10 at 21:12
    
@M_F: Have you tried explicitly setting the command type to Text? I wouldn't expect that to make a difference, but you never know... –  Jon Skeet Dec 26 '10 at 21:21

From what you're describing the problem can only be in the parameter.

Maybe some kind of strange mixup like between varchar and nvarchar on SQL Server, in other words try setting the datatype explicitely.

share|improve this answer

Try to change this line:

parameter.ParameterName = ":name_of_activity";

to

parameter.ParameterName = "name_of_activity";

In other words remove colon character

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.