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I would like to be able to call a closure that I assign to an object's property directly without reassigning the closure to a variable and then calling it. Is this possible?

The code below doesn't work and causes Fatal error: Call to undefined method stdClass::callback().

$obj = new stdClass();
$obj->callback = function() {
    print "HelloWorld!";
};
$obj->callback();
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1  
This is exactly what you need: github.com/ptrofimov/jslikeobject Even more: you can use $this inside closures and use inheritance. Only PHP>=5.4! –  Renato Cuccinotto Jan 10 '13 at 7:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

No. You'd have to implement the magic __call method to intercept the call and invoke the callback (which is not possible for StdClass of course, because you cannot add the __call method)

class Foo
{
    public function __call($method, $args)
    {
        if(is_callable(array($this, $method))) {
            return call_user_func_array($this->$method, $args);
        }
        // else throw exception
    }
}

$foo = new Foo;
$foo->cb = function($who) { return "Hello $who"; };
echo $foo->cb('World');

Note that you cannot do

return call_user_func_array(array($this, $method), $args);

in the __call body, because this would trigger __call in an infinite loop.

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2  
Is there really no way to tell the PHP interpreter to read ($obj->callback)() w/o a variable reassignment (or call_user_func)? Using __call seems like a rather ugly hack and can lead to some confusing code. –  Kendall Hopkins Dec 26 '10 at 21:46
    
@Kendall Not in the current version of PHP. It might be possible in PHP.next though. I think there is a request for stuff like that around. –  Gordon Dec 26 '10 at 22:42
    
@Gordon I don't think it's even possible. You can give a property and a method the same name. That means, if you have a (callable) property prop on $obj, that the behaviour of $obj->property() would depend on whether there is a method of the same name, too, or not. –  Martin Büttner Sep 24 '13 at 14:15
    
@m.buettner well, the parser would have to decide whether it would call the method or the callable first then or raise an ambiguity error. It's certainly possible to implement it somehow. –  Gordon Sep 24 '13 at 14:45
    
@Gordon well, yeah. I didn't mean it's actually impossible to implement that, but that it would lead to some odd conditional behaviour, which I can't imagine would be desirable. –  Martin Büttner Sep 24 '13 at 14:48

You can do this by calling __invoke on the closure, since that's the magic method that objects use to behave like functions:

$obj = new stdClass();
$obj->callback = function() {
    print "HelloWorld!";
};
$obj->callback->__invoke();

Of course that won't work if the callback is an array or a string (which can also be valid callbacks in PHP) - just for closures and other objects with __invoke behavior.

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1  
+1 PERFECT SOLUTION!!! –  marcioAlmada Mar 5 '13 at 19:30
    
@marcioAlmada very ugly though. –  Mahn Jul 6 at 14:19
    
@Mahn I think it's more explicit than the accepted answer. Explicit is better in this case. If you really care for a "cute" solution, call_user_func($obj->callback) is not that bad. –  marcioAlmada Jul 6 at 16:07

Well, if you really insist. Another workaround would be:

$obj = new ArrayObject(array(),2);

$obj->callback = function() {
    print "HelloWorld!";
};

$obj['callback']();

But that's not the nicest syntax.

However, the PHP parser always treats T_OBJECT_OPERATOR, IDENTIFIER, ( as method call. There seems to be no workaround for making -> bypass the method table and access the attributes instead.

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It seems to be possible using call_user_func().

call_user_func($obj->callback);

not elegant, though.... What @Gordon says is probably the only way to go.

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well, it should be emphisized that storing the closure in a variable, and call the varible is actually (wierdly) faster, depending on the call amount, it becomes quite a lot, with xdebug (so very precise measuring), we are talking about 1,5 (the factor, by using a varible, instead of directly calling the __invoke. so instead , just store the closure in a varible and call it.

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If you're using PHP 5.4 or above you could bind a callable to the scope of your object to invoke custom behavior. So for example if you were to have the following set up..

function run_method($object, Closure $method)
{
    $prop = uniqid();
    $object->$prop = \Closure::bind($method, $object, $object);
    $object->$prop->__invoke();
    unset($object->$prop);
}

And you were operating on a class like so..

class Foo
{
    private $value;
    public function getValue()
    {
        return $this->value;
    }
}

You could run your own logic as if you were operating from within the scope of your object

$foo = new Foo();
run_method($foo, function(){
    $this->value = 'something else';
});

echo $foo->getValue(); // prints "something else"
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Here's another alternative based on the accepted answer but extending stdClass directly:

class stdClassExt extends stdClass {
    public function __call($method, $args)
    {
        if (isset($this->$method)) {
            $func = $this->$method;
            return call_user_func_array($func, $args);
        }
    }
}

Usage example:

$foo = new stdClassExt;
$foo->blub = 42;
$foo->whooho = function () { return 1; };
echo $foo->whooho();

You are probably better off using call_user_func or __invoke though.

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Here is another way to successfully call object properties as closure.
When you don't want to change core object use this :

$obj = new AnyObject(); // with or without __invoke() method
$obj->callback = function() {
     return function () {
          print "HelloWorld!";
     };
};
$obj->callback();
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