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What is your recommended best practice for a LAMP server with sort of a high simultaneous load and I need to handle file I/O without getting too hung on a file lock?

I mean, let's say I want to have a SUBSCRIBERS.CSV file that has a bunch of names and email addresses in it. But I want people to be able to fill out a form to unsubscribe. The unsubscribe action would scroll through that file to delete a matching line if it exists for a given email address. This seems like a simple task in PHP, but what happens when you have like 10 people trying to unsubscribe at once, and 10 new subscribers being added? That's where I think PHP might run into trouble and an error might be generated due to a file lock, unless Linux or PHP is more capable than I think.

Note my client wants a CSV file, not a database table. In a database table, this would not be a problem, but as file I/O, I might run into a potential issue, right?

(BTW, to prevent identity theft, I use an .htaccess trick so that one can't download the CSV over the web by guessing its name -- it must only be accessed either by my PHP script or by FTP.)

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2  
Has client described why it should be csv specifically? Why don't store and process all the data in database and sometimes just export data to the csv? – zerkms Dec 27 '10 at 2:04
7  
A single file handling your user information is not a wise choice. This is what databases are for. Yell at your client. – Evan Mulawski Dec 27 '10 at 2:07
1  
I agree, @Evan and @zerkms. I'll see what I can do. – Volomike Dec 27 '10 at 2:13
3  
To prevent identify theft you store the data somewhere where it's impossible to be accessed over the web. That is either in a file outside the webroot, or in a database. Protecting it with an ".htaccess trick" is too fragile. Sorry to say, but bad approach overall. – deceze Dec 27 '10 at 2:15
up vote 8 down vote accepted

If the requirement is for the client to interface with a CSV file, you don't need to actually use the CSV file as the datastore. Instead, use a database, do all your work in a database, and let PHP generate the CSV file on demand.

So, if a client needs to access http://example.com/SUBSCRIBERS.CSV, just have PHP handle SUBSCRIBERS.CSV and use something like:

header("Content-type: text/csv");
$data = get_subscriber_data();
foreach ($data as $row) {
  // $row is an array of columns
  print implode(',', $row);
}
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2  
I would also set up a cron to run daily and create a timestamped csv file so that there is always a csv that is 'being used' and it also allows a series of backups in case of db corruption/failure. – Patrick Dec 27 '10 at 2:19
header("Content-type: text/csv");
$data = get_subscriber_data();
$fp = fopen('php://stdout', 'w'); 
foreach ($data as $row) {
  // $row is an array of columns
  fputcsv($fp, $row);
}
fclose($fp);
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