Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i have a deeply nested structure (actually parsing out xhtml, so lots of nasty), like so:

<tr>
  <td>
    <font id="blah">
      stuff
    </font>
  </td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td>
      more stuff
  </td>
</tr>

and this repeats in a long table. i need an xpath expression that will select the second font tag (or rather it's text()). i was looking at the preceding-sibling axis, but something isn't quite working right.

something along the lines of (and pardon me if this is ridiculous, my xpath is rusty)

//tr[preceding-sibling::tr/td/font]/td/text()
share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a short XPath expression that selects exactly the wanted text node. :) – Dimitre Novatchev Dec 27 '10 at 4:30
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use:

(//tr/td[font])[2]/font/text()

This means:

Select all text-node children of all font elements that are children of the second td in the document that has a font child and is itself a child of some tr element.

As you can see, no preceeding axis is necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
oh, that works too. i figured out what was wrong with mine - it was working, but grabbing all rows that followed that first tr. i changed it to be //tr[preceding-sibling::tr[1]/td/font]/td/text(), and that worked too. basically needed to specify that i wanted the preceding sibling to the the first row. yours is a lot simpler though. – kolosy Dec 27 '10 at 6:03

You've got the right idea. It should work if you get rid of the /b in there.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah - the /b is a copy/paste mistake. it's needed in the actual expression, but not in my example here. – kolosy Dec 27 '10 at 6:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.