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Example code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (){
    int *p;
    {
        int v = 1;
        p = &v;
    }
    printf("%d\n", *p);
    return 0;
}

This code works fine, but I'm not sure if there's a guarantee that the address of v will be preserved.

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3 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There is no guarantee.

Once v goes out of scope, doing anything with it at all (even via a pointer) is considered Undefined Behavior.

As with any other undefined behavior, just because it works on one operating system, compiler, compiler version, time of day, etc, doesn't mean it will work for another.

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In this particular case, you may also notice differences in behavior depending on which compiler optimization settings. Again, nothing is set in stone, because the C standard does not define what is supposed to happen, here. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 27 '10 at 3:01
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To add on Merlyn's answer, one case where this would probably result in behavior you didn't intend is the following:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (){
    int *p;
    {
        int v = 1;
        p = &v;
    }
    {
        int w = 2;
        printf("%d\n", w);
    }
    printf("%d\n", *p);
    return 0;
}

The compiler may optimize this by having v and w share the same allocation on the stack. Again, the compiler might also not optimize this -- that's why the behavior of using pointers to variables after their enclosing block ends isn't defined. The program might output "2" and "1", or "2" and "2", or "2" and something completely different depending on which compiler and settings are used.

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Your last paragraph is wrong. Per C99 §6.8.5.3, "If clause-1 is a declaration, the scope of any identifiers it declares is the remainder of the declaration and the entire loop, including the other two expressions" It is not in scope for the remainder of main. –  Matthew Flaschen Dec 27 '10 at 3:13
1  
@Matthew: Are you sure that refers to lifetime and not just lexical scope? –  cdhowie Dec 27 '10 at 3:14
1  
I believe it's both. The footnote says, "Thus, clause-1 specifies initialization for the loop, possibly declaring one or more variables for use in the loop " (emphasis added). The C++ standard (§6.5.3) explains it more clearly (but I believe equivalently), showing how a simulated block is created. –  Matthew Flaschen Dec 27 '10 at 3:18
1  
@Matthew: I see. I have removed the text from my answer; I'm pretty sure what is left is correct. –  cdhowie Dec 27 '10 at 3:19
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ya it will work sometimes but one cannot be sure that it works ...It sometimes not only causes bus error but even can cause the whole program crash ...

i will give u an example

take a look at this .. http://www.functionx.com/cpp/examples/returnreference.htm

here he is trying to return the reference of a variable which goes out of scope ...(Big blunder) ..but it works ....

u cant guarantee ..So its better (not better best ) never to return reference to data that goes out of scope

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