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I have an Arduino sketch that takes a timet and when that timet is equal to the current time it sets the new timet to timet + 2.

For example:

 char* convert(char* x, String y)
 {
     int hour;
     int minute;

     sscanf(x, "%d:%d", &hour, &minute);

     char buf[6];

     if (y == "6")
     {
         if (hour > 17)
         {
             hour = (hour+6)%24;
             snprintf(buf, 10, "%d:%d", hour, minute );
         }
         else
             if (hour < 18)
             {
                 //hour = hour + 6;
                 minute = (minute + 2);
                 snprintf(buf, 10, "%d:%d", hour, minute);
             }
     }

     if (y == "12")
     {
         if (hour > 11)
         {
             hour = (hour+12)%24;
             snprintf(buf, 10, "%d:%d", hour, minute );
         }
         else
             if (hour < 12)
             {
                   hour = hour + 12;
                   snprintf(buf, 10, "%d:%d", hour, minute);
             }
     }

     if (y == "24")
     {
         hour = (hour+24)%24;
         snprintf(buf, 10, "%d:%d", hour, minute );
     }
     return buf;
}

The sketch starts for example at 1:00am. timet is set to 1:02, at system time 1:02 timet is equal to the system time.

My loops looks like this:

if (timet == currenttime)
{
    timet = convert(timet)
}

Whenever I check the value of timet it should equal 1:04, however I get the correct value at the first run after the execution of convert, however every time after that my timet value is blank.

I tried changing the code instead of using the if loop. I only run the convert function when I send for example t through the serial monitor. This works fine and outputs the correct timet after the execution of the convert function, So I figured the problem is in the if loop...

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
You modified the pointer, not the pointed value!!!! –  Anycorn Dec 27 '10 at 5:40
    
So what am I doing wrong exactly? –  user541597 Dec 27 '10 at 7:53
    
You can't return pointers to local variables. You can't compare strings with == –  Hans Passant Dec 27 '10 at 10:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
if (timet == currenttime){
   timet = convert(timet)
}

This is a bad idea. Either timet stores something in pre-converted format comparable to currenttime or it stores it in post-converted format.

Since you are comparing timet to currenttime, they should be of the same type and format, and be something that can legitimately be compared by the '==' operator.

Probably you want to store timet internally in a numeric format (or whatever you get raw time readings from the runtime in), and convert as you pass it to an output function, or convert to a string format variable (not called timet, but something else!) in preparation for output.

share|improve this answer

looks dodgy...

passing a pointer?

sure you don't mean *x = *x + 2

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my actual convert function, it takes the time that timet is set to and the interval which is 6 12 or 24. the inputs are for example 23:0, and 6, the function splits the 23:0 and adds 6 12 or 24 to the 23. and returns the number after the conversion for example if the input is 23:0 and 6 the output should be 5:0, which is what I get after my first print, but everything after is blank –  user541597 Dec 27 '10 at 5:45

instead of using the if loop

Umm, what loop? There's no such thing as an "if loop". That will run exactly once.

share|improve this answer
    
yea it is suppose to run exactly once the convert should only happen when timet is equal to the system time which happens, however the value I get from that convert only prints once anytime after that it is blank. –  user541597 Dec 27 '10 at 5:44
    
but if i don't use the if loop to to execute the convert function, and call it from the serial monitor it works fine. –  user541597 Dec 27 '10 at 5:48
    
You keep saying if loop. There's no such thing as an if loop. You need to post more code. –  Falmarri Dec 27 '10 at 6:40
    
if statement....... –  user541597 Dec 27 '10 at 7:30
    
Then why do you expect it to keep happening if it's not in a loop? –  Falmarri Dec 27 '10 at 7:34

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