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I have trouble deallocating memory that I allocated using malloc. The program runs fine until it the part where it's supposed to deallocate memory using free. Here the program freezes. So I was wondering what the problem could be since I'm just learning C. Syntactically the code seems correct so could it be that I need to delete all the stuff in that location before deallocating memory from that location or something else?

Here's the code.

// Program to accept and print out five strings
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define NOOFSTRINGS 5
#define BUFFSIZE 255

int main()
{
    char buffer[BUFFSIZE];//buffer to temporarily store strings input by user
    char *arrayOfStrngs[NOOFSTRINGS];
    int i;

    for(i=0; i<NOOFSTRINGS; i++)
    {
        printf("Enter string %d:\n",(i+1));
        arrayOfStrngs[i]=(char*)malloc(strlen(gets(buffer)+1));//calculates string length and allocates appropriate memory
        if( arrayOfStrngs[i] != NULL)//checking if memory allocation was successful
        {
            strcpy(arrayOfStrngs[i], buffer);//copies input string srom buffer to a storage loacation
        }
        else//prints error message and exits
        {
            printf("Debug: Dynamic memory allocation failed");
            exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    printf("\nHere are the strings you typed in:\n");
    //outputting all the strings input by the user
    for(i=0; i<NOOFSTRINGS; i++)
    {
        puts(arrayOfStrngs[i]);
        printf("\n");
    }

    //Freeing up allocated memory
    for(i=0; i<NOOFSTRINGS; i++)
    {
        free(arrayOfStrngs[i]);
        if(arrayOfStrngs[i] != NULL)
        {
            printf("Debug: Memory deallocation failed");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Classic style bug. Putting code in more than one line doesn't cost anything more. Also, gets() can return NULL, kaboom. –  Hans Passant Dec 27 '10 at 15:39
2  
!!! Never use gets(). Ever. BTW, your error reporting is wrong: calling free does not affect the value of the pointer you passed in - this is not possible in C, without adding another layer of indirection, which free does not. Even if the memory is successfully deallocated, your program thinks it isn't. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 27 '10 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You misuse strlen() and this results in buffer overrun:

arrayOfStrngs[i]=(char*)malloc(strlen(gets(buffer)+1)); //pointer from gets() is incremented and passed to strlen()  - that's wrong

should be

arrayOfStrngs[i]=(char*)malloc(strlen(gets(buffer))+1); //pointer from gets() is passed to strlen(), then returned value is incremented - correct

also free() doesn't change the pointer passed to it. So that

 char* originalValue = pointerToFree;
 free( pointerToFree ); 
 assert( pointerToFree == originalValue ); //condition will always hold true

and so in your code freeing memory should just be

//Freeing up allocated memory
for(i=0; i<NOOFSTRINGS; i++)
{
    free(arrayOfStrngs[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I actually didn't know my way around free() very well so that tip on free() not altering the value of the pointer was enlightening. You were right though. The buffer overflow was the cause of the problem but I forgot to include something in the question above and I'd be grateful if you helped on this one too. How is it that the array buffer is "cleaned" of all of its previous data before gets() inputs data from the user into it without the programmer specifying this? –  Steve S Dec 27 '10 at 15:51
2  
"How is it that the array buffer is "cleaned" of all of its previous data before gets() inputs data from the user into it without the programmer specifying this?" It isn't. It doesn't need to be. The previous data gets overwritten. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 27 '10 at 16:27
arrayOfStrngs[i]=(char*)malloc(strlen(gets(buffer)+1));//calculates string length and allocates appropriate memory

Shouldn't that be

arrayOfStrngs[i]=(char*)malloc(strlen(gets(buffer))+1);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly. Current implementation features a buffer overrun. –  sharptooth Dec 27 '10 at 13:33
    
And a very cool one -- a +1 that acts as a -1. –  David Schwartz Aug 28 '11 at 11:47

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