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In bash we have:

for i in `cat file` ; do
#do something here for example
echo $i    
done;

How can I do that in a perl script?

I tried it with

#! /usr/bin/perl  
use warnings; 
use strict;  
my $lines; 
while (<>) {   $lines .= $_ if 3 .. 5; } continue {   close ARGV if eof; }  

print $lines; 

but it does not loop through them; it prints all lines from file on first run.

Thank you.

EDIT: Yes, but it still does not loop through them; the script takes all variables and if for example I have

print "Header here\n";  
print $lines;  
print "Footer here\n\n";

and my variables file contains

line1
line2
line3
line4
etc...

it prints:

Header here
line1
line2
line3
line4 etc..
Footer here 

instead of

Header here
line1
Footer here 

Header here
line2
Footer here 

Header here
line3
Footer here 

Header here
line4
Footer here 

etc...
share|improve this question
2  
You are doing different things in your perl script than your bash script; do you really want the perl script to do just what the bash script does? If so, you've got a lot of extra stuff added that is confusing the issue. If not, please show how you want to invoke the perl script, sample input, and expected output. – ysth Dec 27 '10 at 13:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Trying again:

Replace your $lines .= $_ with push @lines, $_.

Then where you print, do:

for (@lines) {
    print "Header here\n";
    print $_;
    print "Footer here\n\n";
}

instead of printing $lines, etc.

Though it sounds like you don't want the stuff selecting only lines 3 through 5; if that's the case, your whole program should just be:

use strict;
use warnings;
while (<>) {
    print "Header here\n";
    print $_;
    print "Footer here\n\n";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
No, that's not right. <> assumes @ARGV contains filenames, concatenates them all and spins through their contents line by line (actually, "record by record" in this case). – masonk Dec 27 '10 at 13:54
    
@masonk: I was guessing that might be what was wanted; now I see it's not. – ysth Dec 27 '10 at 13:58
    
#! /usr/bin/perl use warnings; use strict; my $lines; while (<>) { push @lines, $_ if 3 .. 5; } for (@lines) { print "Header here\n"; print $lines; print "Footer here\n\n"; } Like ThIS? – justin382 Dec 27 '10 at 14:01
    
it gives Global symbol "@lines" requires explicit package name at ./pers line 6,8 10 – justin382 Dec 27 '10 at 14:04
    
perfect thank;s this is the answer – justin382 Dec 27 '10 at 14:11

Bash:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
while read i ; do
    echo $i
done < file

Perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict; use warnings;
open(my $fh, '<', 'file') or die $!;
while (my $i = <$fh>){
    print $i;
}
close($fh) or die $!;
share|improve this answer
  1. You're taking <> apart and then immediately putting it back together with the .= concatenate operator. If you want to do something to each line, such as print a header or footer, then you do it inside the loop.

  2. It's possible that your input record separator is wrong and <> is not really going through multiple times. Print something inside the loop, such as ++$count, to see how many times you actually entered the loop. You might have to change your IRS, which is the $/ variable.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm beginner , dont really get what u saying.. sry – justin382 Dec 27 '10 at 14:08
    
3..5 is only true on lines 3 to 5. The flip flop operator behaves differently if the parameter is a scalar. See perlop – justintime Dec 27 '10 at 18:23
    
1. Operators don't take parameters. They take operands. 2. The .. char sequence is only the flip flop operator in scalar context; it is the range constructor operator in list context. 3. The expression 3 .. 5 is in scalar context in the OP. 4. I didn't understand your comment. 5. But I did read perldoc perlop, and found the following that explains it well: If either operand of scalar ".." is a constant expression, that operand is considered true if it is equal ("==") to the current input line number (the $. variable). Thanks for the tip! Removing my first point. – masonk Dec 27 '10 at 21:39

I am not sure what your after. But if I wanted to achieve the same in Perl on stdin, as you have in your bash script I would do something like this:

#! /usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

while(<>)
{
   # Do something to $_ e.g. print lines 3 through 5
   print if 3 .. 5;
}
share|improve this answer

Bash:

for i in `cat file` ; do
#do something here for example
echo $i    
done;

Perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

while (<>) {
  print $_;
}

man perlvar for more information on the $_ variable

share|improve this answer

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