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I have a program that uses (and must continue to use) an old sorting function implementing qsort. I must also provide the sorting function with proper data to sort data both ascending (if string contains even numbers) or descending (if string conaints odd numbers).

The data must be altered to achieve this, the sorting function cannot be altered.

The code is written in c but i have no relevant code snippet for this particular problem.

The real question is:

How do I transform the data so that the output matches the desired output below?

I have the following data (or similar)

String 1
String 2
String 3
String 4
String 5
String 6

EDIT: The data is a number of strings type char **, the number within each string is an int.

The desired output is

String 5
String 3
String 1
String 2
String 4
String 6

Sorting is usually done in a descending fashion matching the input 1:1. I have managed to produce a transformation rendering the following output by prepending 1 or 0 to the numbers following the string.

So the internal data to be sorted looks like this

String 01
String 12
String 03
String 14
String 05
String 16

This produces the following output (transformation is only used in sorting, and is temporary).

String 1
String 3
String 5
String 2
String 4
String 6
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+1 This seems like a really fun interview-type question! –  Davidann Dec 27 '10 at 17:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should have a struct which contains data, and value:

Struct DataValue
{
   string data;
   int value;
} 

like {"01", 1} Then sort by value and output data, sorting is not hard if you want to do usual sort: first sort by value to make list like what you shown. (for values) now create an empty array of data values (with base array size), start from last item and fill it as bellow:

    int j = 0;
    for (int i = a.Count - 1; i >= 0; i -= 2) // fill bottom of list
    {
        b[a.Count - 1 - j] = a[i];
        j++;
    }

    j = 0;
    for (int i = a.Count - 2; i >= 0; i -= 2)  // fill root of list
    {
        b[j] = a[i];
        j++;
    }

At last output the values.

I wrote it in c# it's not very different in c. you will get:

  List<int> a = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,6,7};

   b==> 6,4,2,1,3,5,7

and for:
  List<int> a = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,6};
  b==> 5,3,1,2,4,6
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Actually this is actually very similar to what i have, the difference is that i have data in files and value is in my internal sorting structure. Ehm, I hope that makes sense. –  Peter Lindqvist Dec 27 '10 at 15:59
    
It's not plug and play, but it gave me some inspiration, thank you! –  Peter Lindqvist Dec 27 '10 at 16:05
    
@Peter Lindqvist, if the data is like "string 01" you can trim it to retrieve 1 and do in memory sorting but, if the file size is big (wich causes to exception) and you can't read it in memory, you can use in place sorting methods to sort them, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-place_algorithm –  Saeed Amiri Dec 27 '10 at 16:07
    
+1 for adding code –  Davidann Dec 27 '10 at 16:51

This can be done in-place (that is, with a single array of values and not requiring a separate list), using a custom comparison routine. The function below assumes you're sorting the strings directly. It's probably better to pre-process the data so that you extract the number from the string and place both into a structure. But this will give you the idea.

You would pass a pointer to this comparison function to qsort.

int Comparer(void * v1, void * v2)
{
    char *s1 = (char *)v1;
    char *s2 = (char *)v2;

    // Here, extract the numbers from the ends of the strings.
    int n1 = // extract number
    int n2 = // extract number

    // First comparison sorts odd numbers above even numbers
    if ((n1 % 2) == 1)
    {
        // first number is odd
        if ((n2 % 2) == 1)
        {
            // second number is odd, so sort the numbers ascending
            return (n1 - n2);
        }
        else
        {
            // second number is even, which is "greater than" any odd number
            return -1;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        // first number is even
        if ((n2 % 2) == 0)
        {
            // second number is even, so sort the numbers descending
            return (n2 - n1);
        }
        else
        {
            // second number is odd, which is "less than" any even number
            return 1;
        }
    }
}
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It's a valid solution but I'm afraid it cannot be applied in my environment. –  Peter Lindqvist Dec 28 '10 at 7:31

Prepend 9-i if i is odd. Prepend 9 otherwise.

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Perhaps, if I assume 9 to be short for INT_MAX –  Peter Lindqvist Dec 27 '10 at 15:57
  1. Preprocess: put even strings in a list (let's call this list _evens_) and put odd strings in a seperate list (called _odds_)
  2. Sort both lists
  3. Create a destination list
  4. Treat the _odds_ list as a stack: pop the top of _odds_ and place the popped element onto the *front* of the destination list.
  5. Treat the _evens_ as a queue: pop the top of the _evens_ and place the popped element at the *end* of the destination list.
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