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I am interested to learn about how proprietary applications, that are statically or dynamically linked to GNU C Library (glibc) or any other software library with LGPL license, are describing their EULA (End User License Agreement). Are any examples available?

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closed as off-topic by durron597, Raphael Miedl, cpburnz, Jeffrey Bosboom, Pang Jun 4 at 1:26

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Since it's LGPL, I guess you can use it (as a library) without being affected much by the licence, so I'd expect all sorts of EULAs, ranging from giftware to strictly closed-source. –  tdammers Dec 27 '10 at 16:35
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LGPL has a clause related to reverse engineering and that would be the interesting part of EULAs of those proprietary applications which are statically or dynamically linked to GNU C Library (glibc). –  bhadra Dec 27 '10 at 17:26
    
could you point us to that clause? –  Ismael Dec 31 '11 at 20:30
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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because licensing advice is off-topic on Stack Overflow. You may be able to get help on Programmers Stack Exchange, but read their faq carefully before proceeding. –  durron597 Jun 3 at 18:53
    
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing and legal issues, not programming or software development. See here for details, and the help center for more. –  Pang Jun 4 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

For commercial applications LPGL allows you to link dynamically, also note that statically linking glibc will end up with lots of trouble, its not officially supported either.

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