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So I just tried debugging the following error:

<script>
$(function() {
    div = $('<div />');
    div.text('test');
    div.hide(0);
    div.appendto('body');
});
</script>

When I execute this the DIV gets shown. Eventough I hide (before we add it to the DOM) it. The following code:

<script>
$(function() {
    div = $('<div />');
    div.text('test');
    div.hide();
    div.appendto('body');
});
</script>

does hide the DIV.

When I go into jQuery's source code for the hide function I see this:

    hide: function( speed, easing, callback ) {
    if ( speed || speed === 0 ) {
        return this.animate( genFx("hide", 3), speed, easing, callback);

    } else {
        for ( var i = 0, j = this.length; i < j; i++ ) {
            var display = jQuery.css( this[i], "display" );

            if ( display !== "none" ) {
                jQuery.data( this[i], "olddisplay", display );
            }
        }

        // Set the display of the elements in a second loop
        // to avoid the constant reflow
        for ( i = 0; i < j; i++ ) {
            this[i].style.display = "none";
        }

        return this;
    }
},

Why does it check for

if ( speed || speed === 0 ) {

Especially the, speed === 0. I would assume, when the speed is zero. One can just skip the animate function entirely and just add the display: none; to the element.

ps. I assume that since we give a element that does not exist in the dom to the animate function it simply fails. There is nothing to animate. There for, the animate function does not actually hide the DIV.

Thanks for any answers in forward :) Was searching for about 10 minutes for the correct syntax (hide()) instead of hide(0)) But still found it illogical. Therefor the question :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you wanted to skip the animate, you would just do .hide()...by allowing .hide(0) as well, you can queue it without a duration...so it adds a great deal of utility to the function.

For example:

$(".myElem").delay(2000).hide(0);

Where as this wouldn't work:

$(".myElem").delay(2000).hide();

....because .hide() without arguments isn't part of any fx queue, and would happen instantly.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmh. Hadn't thought of the queueing thingey. Thanks :) –  Tjirp Dec 27 '10 at 17:58

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