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Recently I saw some code like this:

<tr> 
     <th> Some label: </th>
     <td> <input type="text" value=""/> </td>
     <th> Another label: </th>
     <td> <input type="text" value=""/> </td>
</tr>

I am used to table headers being used like

<tr> 
     <th> Some label: </th>
     <th> Another label: </th>
</tr>
<tr>
     <td> <input type="text" value=""/> </td>
     <td> <input type="text" value=""/> </td>
</tr>

How are table headers supposed to be used? The first example above, lead me to some pretty funky formatting issues, and it seems like in example 1 <label> should be used in place of <th>.

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3  
That basic problem here is that tables shouldn't be used to layout forms. –  Quentin Dec 27 '10 at 18:43
    
what do you mean? –  stevebot Dec 27 '10 at 18:47
3  
Tables are for displaying tabular data, not for positioning the layout of elements. The latter is considered bad styling. –  David Dec 27 '10 at 18:48
    
ah, thanks, that makes sense. –  stevebot Dec 27 '10 at 18:58
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Neither of them is correct. A header is used to provide the header for a table and not as a layout mechanism for form fields. As you mentioned I would use <label>. Tables should be used to present tabular data.

I am assuming that you copied the example to show how a <th> is actually used and don't intend to use it for layout purposes. If that is the case then you are correct in your structuring and would recommend adding <thead> and <tbody> elements like so:

<table>
   <thead>
      <tr>
         <th>Heading 1</th>
         <th>Heading 2</th>
      </tr>
   </thead>
   <tbody>
      <tr>
         <td>Row 1 Col 1 Data</td>
         <td>Row 1 Col 2 Data</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
         <td>Row 2 Col 1 Data</td>
         <td>Row 2 Col 2 Data</td>
      </tr>
   </tbody>
</table>

One advantage for this is that if your page spans multiple pages when you print it, the header will show up automatically on each page.

Note that there is aslo a <tfoot> element that you can use.

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Thanks and yes the example I showed was to show how I thought th elements were supposed to be used. Unfortunately for me, I'm working on someone else's code, where they used a table to layout 50 plus input fields :(. –  stevebot Dec 27 '10 at 19:00
    
@stevebot There is no way to sugarcoat it, but it sounds like web development hell. Nothing a little CSS and some restructuring wouldn't fix. Anyway, 50 plus input fields on a page seems like it needs a little UX love to make it increase the usability. –  Waleed Al-Balooshi Dec 27 '10 at 19:04
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You are correct, the th elements should be in their own tr element. And I agree that the first example should instead call for label elements. (Well, both examples call for something other than tables to be used entirely, but that's not the meat of the question.)

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In your first example labels and input-fields will be in the same row. This is not how <TH> was supposed to be used. In the second example you have the headers in their own row above the input fields. You certainly need to add <table> and </table>.

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