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Here's how I did it:

inNumber = somenumber
inNumberint = int(inNumber)
if inNumber == inNumberint:
    print "this number is an int"
else:
    print "this number is a float"

Something like that.
Are there any nicer looking ways to do this?

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2  
>>> 5.0 == int(5.0) True –  Wooble Dec 27 '10 at 19:20
3  
The trick is to search on SO for all the other times this question was asked. Each of those will provide a repeat of the same, standard answer. –  S.Lott Dec 27 '10 at 19:21
1  
... And why do you need to know? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 27 '10 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

Use isinstance.

>>> x = 12
>>> isinstance(x, int)
True
>>> y = 12.0
>>> isinstance(y, float)
True

So:

>>> if isinstance(x, int):
        print 'x is a int!'

x is a int!

*EDIT:*

As pointed out, in case of long integers, the above won't work. So you need to do:

>>> x = 12L
>>> import numbers
>>> isinstance(x, numbers.Integral)
True
>>> isinstance(x, int)
False
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wouldn't issubclass be more generic? –  David Heffernan Dec 27 '10 at 19:26
    
@David: issubclass would be an error, as it works on classes. isinstance checks if a given object is an instance of a class or one of that class's subclasses, so it's perfectly generic. Methinks that isinstance(obj, cls) is equivalent to issubclass(obj.__class__, cls) –  delnan Dec 27 '10 at 19:33
2  
This doesn't work for other integer types, for example if x = 12L. I know only int was asked for, but it's nice to fix other problems before they happen. The most generic is probably isinstance(x, numbers.Integral). –  Scott Griffiths Dec 27 '10 at 19:39
    
@delnan Thanks, I wasn't aware that isinstance checked for subclasses. Thinking about it, it seems obvious now that it makes no sense to do anything else. If one wants to check to class identity then one can write type(obj) is cls. –  David Heffernan Dec 27 '10 at 19:39
1  
For Python 2, there is also the direct double check: isinstance(x, (int, long)). –  EOL Apr 28 '13 at 13:05

It's Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Ask Permission. Simply perform the operation. If it works, the object was of an acceptable, suitable, proper type. If the operation doesn't work, the object was not of a suitable type. Knowing the type rarely helps.

Simply attempt the operation and see if it works.

inNumber = somenumber
try:
    inNumberint = int(inNumber)
    print "this number is an int"
except ValueError:
    pass
try:
    inNumberfloat = float(inNumber)
    print "this number is a float"
except ValueError:
    pass
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5  
Is there any reason to do this when type and isinstance can do the job? –  user225312 Dec 27 '10 at 19:28
    
int(1.5) doesn't raise ValueError, and you obviously know that--giving a wrong answer on purpose? Seriously? –  Glenn Maynard Dec 27 '10 at 19:57
    
@Glenn: I assume S.Lott understood the question as "check if a string is an int or float" (in which case it would actually be a good solution). –  delnan Dec 27 '10 at 20:00
    
@A A: class MetaInt(type): pass; class Int(int): __metaclass__ = MetaInt; type(Int(1)) == int. (Sorry for the bad syntax but I cannot do more on one line.) –  mg. Dec 27 '10 at 20:13
1  
@A A: Yes. The reason is that this is simpler and more reliable. The distinction between int and float may not even be relevant for many algorithms. Requesting the type explicitly is usually a sign of bad polymorphism or an even more serious design problem. In short. Don't Check for Types. It's Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Ask Permission. –  S.Lott Dec 27 '10 at 21:06

What you can do too is usingtype() Example:

if type(inNumber) == int : print "This number is an int"
elif type(inNumber) == float : print "This number is a float"
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