Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am working on a rather large code base that has a bit of the #ifdef magic going on. I'm looking at one file and trying to determine where a type is defined. Unfortunately, it includes many file, which include many files, which include many files, etc. some of which define macros that affect which definitions you might use. The structure is sufficiently complicated that after 10 minutes worth of grepping and following the include chains, I still have no idea which definition is being used. I recall that visual studio has a nice feature where I can right click on the type and it will show where the type is defined. Is there an equivalent nice tool for linux that reads make files, etc? I'm sure there is, but I still just use vim + grep for my development environment.

share|improve this question
    
Why not using gdb, if that is an option , because I don't think vim has an option like VS unless an add in exists somewhere ? Use an IDE like NetBeans. Related question, not a duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/559274/… – DumbCoder Dec 27 '10 at 20:12
    
Instead of wasting time and effort tracking down the definition of that variable you could always better spend your resources planning the murder of the person who did it. – Crazy Eddie Dec 27 '10 at 20:26
up vote 4 down vote accepted

With complicated defines and dependencies this feature doesn't always work in Visual Studio either.

Solution: ask your compiler to dump the code after it was preprocessed, ask it to print #line and #file directives too. Search through the resulted file for your type, then look at the closest #file directive to see where it came from.

(In GCC you can use the -E switch)

share|improve this answer
    
This worked great. And you're right, what better way to parse all the preprocessor macros than with the preprocessor? – pythonic metaphor Dec 27 '10 at 20:24
    
Sometimes it is useful/quick to write a short program using the same options & libraries as your project and leverage any show routines (if available) to help determine which definition of the structure is used. – Sparky Dec 27 '10 at 20:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.