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Here's the scenario I'm facing:

An appointment could be scheduled for:

  1. today
  2. some time during the week
  3. on a specific date

So, the attributes can be different for each "type" of appointment.

I was thinking of these models and using it with STI, but I'm not sure if I'm on the right track:

class Appointment < ActiveRecord::Base
class TodayAppointment < Appointment
class WeekAppointment < Appointment
class SpecificDateAppointment < Appointment

Table:

string,   Type      #type of the appointment (TodayAppointment, WeekAppointment...)
datetime, When      #data used when type field is "SpecificDateAppointment"
string,   Something #used when type field is "TodayAppointment"

What's the best way to model this?

Is this a good candidate for Single Table Inheritance?

UPDATE

Thanks @Mike, @SpyrosP for the help so far. I've come up with the options that I have below.

These are the "views" of the database tables and what they would look like.

Which one seems most appropriate?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Option A--(Polymorphic Association)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
|patients               |   day_appointments    |   week_appointments
|   appointment_type    |   data                |   data
|   appointment_id      |                       |
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Option B--(Child references parent) (What is this pattern called?)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
|patients               |   day_appointments    |   week_appointments
|                       |   patient_id          |   patient_id
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Option C--(Polymorphic Association + Single Table Inheritance of appointments)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
|patients               |   appointments        |
|   appointment_type    |   type                |
|   appointment_id      |   day_data            |
|                       |   week_data           |
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Option D--(Child references parent + Single Table Inheritance of appointments)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
|patients               |   appointments        |
|                       |   type                |
|                       |   day_data            |
|                       |   patient_id          |
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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2 Answers 2

You're close, but it looks like you could benefit from the use of Class Table Inheritance. My reasoning is that you have different attributes for each concrete type.

Here's some sample code in vanilla Ruby. I believe it's way easier to understand than any description I can give.

class Appointment
    def persist
        raise "Must be implemented."
    end
end

class TodayAppointment < Appointment
    def persist
        TodayAppointmentMapper save self
    end
end

class WeekAppointment < Appointment
    def persist
        WeekAppointmentMapper save self
    end
end

class Mapper
    def save aAppointment
        raise "Must be implemented."
    end
end

class TodayAppointmentMapper < Mapper
    def save aAppointment
        # Specfic Today Appointment persistence details.
    end
end

class WeekAppointmentMapper < Mapper
    def save aAppointment
        # Specfic Week Appointment persistence details.
    end
end

Notice the ability for each concrete type to transparently select the appropriate mapper. Consider combining this with Dependency Injection for easier testing.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't heard of "Class Table Inheritance"! What is it? –  Zabba Dec 27 '10 at 22:15
    
Updated my answer. I omitted it because you mentioned Single Table Inheritance. They're both from Martin Fowler's book, Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture. PS: Read the whole darn book, it'll give you your design jollies. –  Mike Dec 27 '10 at 22:19
    
Thanks for the advice, I shall soon. So you suggestion is that I use separate tables, one for each appointment type? Then how do I ensure that some Patient model that owns the appointment, only has one of the three types of appointments? Should I make Patient belongs_to --what--? –  Zabba Dec 27 '10 at 22:38

I haven't used them yet to be sincere, but it looks like you need polymorphic models.

http://railscasts.com/episodes/154-polymorphic-association

Take a look please. It's a way to create a polymorphic model for different occasions, like in your example.

share|improve this answer
    
I think Polymorphic Associations are used when one model needs to "belong to" many others (for example, many models may need an Address, so Address can belong to many models). Doesn't look like Polymorphic Associations apply here? Or do they? –  Zabba Dec 27 '10 at 22:11
    
exactly, but then each model has its own characteristics, like your models do. You would then add something like "has_many :todaysAppointments, :as=> :appointment. I suppose that would work. –  Spyros Dec 27 '10 at 22:16
    
this looks similar btw stackoverflow.com/questions/2586329/… –  Spyros Dec 27 '10 at 22:17
    
@SpyrosP : But also, what I really need is that "has_one today_appointment" OR "has_one week_appointment" OR "has_one specific_appointment".. how would I be able to enforce that? –  Zabba Dec 27 '10 at 22:33
    
you mean that you need to write has_one week_appointment or be able to do something like week_appointment.time, today_appointment.time etc ? The latter will happen, but if you explicitly want to specify has_one today_appointment, is there a reason to do that ? –  Spyros Dec 27 '10 at 22:58

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