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Got nothing better to do this Christmas holiday, so I decided to try out making a binary search tree. I'm stuck with the print function. How should the logic behind it work? Since the tree is already inserting it in a somewhat sorted order, and I want to print the tree from smallest values to the biggest.

So I need to travel to the furthest left branch of the tree to print the first value. Right, so after that how do I remember the way back up, do I need to save the previous node? A search in wikipedia gave me an solution which they used stack. And other solutions I couldn't quite understand how they've made it, so I'm asking here instead hoping someone can enlight me.

I also wonder my insert function is OK. I've seen other's solution being smaller.

void treenode::insert(int i)
{

   if(root == 0)
   {
      cout << "root" << endl;
      root = new node(i,root);
   }
   else
   {
      node* travel = root;
      node* prev;
      while(travel)
      {
         if(travel->value > i)
         {
            cout << "travel left" << endl;
            prev = travel;
            travel = travel->left;
         }
         else
         {
            cout << "travel right" << endl;
            prev = travel;
            travel = travel->right;
         }
      }
      //insert
      if(prev->value > i)
      {
         cout << "left" << endl;
         prev->left = new node(i);
      }
      else
      {
         cout << "right" << endl;
         prev->right = new node(i);
      }
   }

}

void treenode::print()
{

   node* travel = root;
   while(travel)
   {
      cout << travel->value << endl;
      travel = travel->left;
   }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use recursion (pseudocode):

prin-tree(node):
   print-tree(left-subnode) if exists
   print(node-value)
   print-tree(right-subnode) if exists
...
print(root-of-tree)
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funny thing it works. Not so funny is that I don't understand it... I hate recursion... –  starcorn Dec 27 '10 at 22:54
4  
@starcorn - If you feel that way about recursion, my suggestion would be drop this project and take up writing programs in Lisp for a while until you are comfortable with it. There are reasons to avoid it on occasion, but to be a truly expert developer recursion needs to be in your toolbox. –  T.E.D. Dec 27 '10 at 22:57
1  
@starcorn - for the uninitiated recursion can be daunting - most of us go through that! Here is an easy way to understand recursion - the "crux" of a recursive call is not in the recursion itself, rather it is in the "end cases", viz., the parts of the code that execute when you are not going to do a recursive call. Start by trying to understand the print functions - the difference version postorder, preorder and inorder. A quick search showed up this web page cs.umd.edu/class/spring2002/cmsc214/Tutorial/recursion.html –  Abhi Dec 27 '10 at 23:21

The traditional CS101 way to traverse a binary tree to do anything (printing, searching, insertion, etc.) is to use recursion. Have the (whatever) routine check its current node, then if that isn't the one it is looking for, call itself with the left and/or right subtree (if there is one).

For a nice discussion, with psedocode, check out the Wikipedia article on tree traversal. It even shows how to do it without recursion, which would match how you did insertion.

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It all depends on the definition of the tree. If the nodes do not contain pointers back to the parent, then you need to use a stack to print the in-order transversal. The simplest way would be to write a recursive function to use the application's stack. The algorithm has already been shown before, but basically:

in-order(node):
   in-order(node.left) if node.left not null
   process(node)
   in-order(node.right) if node.right not null

If nodes hold pointers back to the parent, then you could write an iterative version, but it is probably not worth the effort (for anything but food for thought)

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