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Is there a way to set the EnableSSL from the web.config?

I could set this property in code, but that wouldn't work for the Simple Mail Web Event and other classes that uses the default Smtp Server. Any ideas?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 13 down vote accepted

For .NET 3 and earlier: You can't. You have to manage it by hand.

For more information you can see http://robertseder.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!587F478B9240C01E!270.entry.

For .NET 4: You can.

See http://theoldsewingfactory.com/2011/01/06/enable-ssl-in-web-config-for-smtpclient/

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6  
As of .net 4.0 you can now set enableSsl in the webconfig: theoldsewingfactory.com/2011/01/06/… –  ilivewithian Jan 6 '11 at 20:53
    
@ilivewithian no you can't. At least I can't. –  David Murdoch Apr 28 '11 at 0:29
    
@eKek0, as the accepted answer, could you update the text to say that you can in .net 4, please? See the ilivewithian's comment for the reference. –  Giles Roberts Jan 18 '12 at 18:05
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I have a dirty workaround (until .NET 4.0 comes out). Instead of changin my code it relies on the used port to determine if SSL is required or not.

var client = new SmtpClient();
client.EnableSsl = client.Port == 587 || client.Port == 465;
// This could also work
//client.EnableSsl = client.Port != 25;

I said it was a dirty hack, but it working fine for the different configurations that we encounter.

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Good workaround. –  UpTheCreek Jan 23 '11 at 9:23
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this works for me in .net 4

E.G. in web.config

network host="somesmtpserver" userName="do_not_reply@yourserver.com" 
password="whatever" port="25" enableSsl="true"         
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enableSsl="true" isn't actually supported –  David Murdoch Apr 28 '11 at 0:29
    
This works for me in .net 4. –  Giles Roberts Jan 18 '12 at 18:01
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Ah, there is a way to do it for the 'forgot password' built in .net login controls though.

See http://blogs.msdn.com/vikas/archive/2008/04/29/bug-asp-net-2-0-passwordrecovery-web-control-cannot-send-emails-to-ssl-enabled-smtp-servers.aspx

Ryan

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Just extend the class and set EnableSsl = true and use that class.

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I think there's a bug in the MailSettingsSectionGroup. See below code:

        Configuration configurationFile = WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration("~/web.config");
        var mailSettings = configurationFile.GetSectionGroup("system.net/mailSettings") as MailSettingsSectionGroup;

        _smtpClient.Host = mailSettings.Smtp.Network.Host;
        _smtpClient.Port = mailSettings.Smtp.Network.Port;
        _smtpClient.EnableSsl = mailSettings.Smtp.Network.**EnableSsl**;
        _smtpClient.Credentials = new System.Net.NetworkCredential(mailSettings.Smtp.Network.UserName, mailSettings.Smtp.Network.Password);
        _smtpClient.UseDefaultCredentials = false;

It seems that EnableSsl does not exist as a property under Network, when i run and debug this, i can see the value though, but can't compile the code due to missing ExtensionMethod.

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I appears the class is sealed, so i made a manual extension. I thought i'd provide it for others here. Hope it can be of use to others.

/// <summary>
/// OldSchool extension of SmtpNetWorkElement, since it's sealed.
/// </summary>
public class SmtpNetworkElementEx
{
    private readonly SmtpNetworkElement m_SmtpNetWorkElement;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="SmtpNetworkElementEx"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public SmtpNetworkElementEx()
    {
        Configuration configurationFile = WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration("~/web.config");
        var mailSettings = configurationFile.GetSectionGroup("system.net/mailSettings") as MailSettingsSectionGroup;

        if (mailSettings == null)
            return;

        m_SmtpNetWorkElement = mailSettings.Smtp.Network;
    }

    public string Host { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.Host; } }
    public bool DefaultCredentials { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.DefaultCredentials; } }
    public string ClientDomain { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.ClientDomain; } }
    public string TargetName { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.TargetName; } }
    public int Port { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.Port; } }
    public string UserName { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.UserName; } }
    public string Password { get { return m_SmtpNetWorkElement.Password; } }
    public bool EnableSsl { get { return Convert.ToBoolean(m_SmtpNetWorkElement.ElementInformation.Properties["enableSsl"].Value); } }
}

Use this way:

var smtpSettings = new SmtpNetworkElementEx();

_smtpClient.Host = smtpSettings.Host;
_smtpClient.Port = smtpSettings.Port;
_smtpClient.EnableSsl = smtpSettings.EnableSsl;
_smtpClient.Credentials = new System.Net.NetworkCredential(smtpSettings.UserName, smtpSettings.Password);
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I have searched almost everywhere for this.

But it seems there is no way we can configure EnableSsl Property in web.config.

Have a look at this

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Giles Roberts Jan 18 '12 at 18:01 said

this works for me in .net 4

E.G. in web.config

network host="somesmtpserver" userName="do_not_reply@yourserver.com" 
password="whatever" port="25" enableSsl="true" 

Port 25 is not a SSL port. Port 25 is the default SMTP port. Furthermore the web.config code is partly filled out. The code should be

    <system.net>
         <mailSettings>
              <smtp deliveryMethod="Network" from="user@gmail.com">
                     <network host="smtp.gmail.com"
                     userName="user@gmail.com"
                     password="********"
                     port="587"
                     defaultCredentials="true"
                     enableSsl="true" />
             </smtp>
        </mailSettings>
   </system.net>

This settings above is more accurate then the original web.config code. I don't know witch method is better. Using web.config or using the code-behind page to send the e-mail. No matter witch method you use the code-behind file has to be modified. I say this because you have to wire up From, Subject, and Body text boxes. I'm taking it for granted that the end results that you want to send a message through an aspx web page

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