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I have the following model and configuration:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public User CreatedBy { get; set; }
    public DateTime? DateCreated { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }
}

public class UserConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<User>
{
    public UserConfiguration()
    {
        this.HasKey(t => t.Id);

        this.HasOptional(u => u.CreatedBy);
        this.Property(u => u.DateCreated);

        this.Property(u => u.Name).HasMaxLength(64);
        this.Property(u => u.Username).HasMaxLength(64);
    }
}

public class SampleContext : DbContext
{

    public IDbSet<User> Users { get; set; }

    public SampleContext(string dbConnection)
        : base(dbConnection)
    {

    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new UserConfiguration());
    }
}

I can work with the context and add users just fine. I then was looking at the table generated by Code First and realized that the CreatedBy property isn't generating a CreatedById column but rather a UserId column. If I add another property such as ModifiedBy it will generate UserId1 and so on:

alt text

I tried mapping with HasRequired() as well but the property still generates a column name that matches the actual type and not the property name. Any help would be appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You basically want to create a Self-Reference Independent Association with a custom Foreign Key column name and here is the fluent API code to do this:

public UserConfiguration()
{
    this.HasRequired(u => u.CreatedBy)
        .WithMany()
        .IsIndependent()
        .Map(m => 
        {
            m.MapKey(u => u.Id, "CreatedById");
        });
}

However, this code throws an exception due to a bug in CTP5. Hence, for the time being, you can use the suggested workaround in MSDN forum (changing your independent association to FK association and explicitly name your FK property) and save this code for the RTM next year.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Awesome to know! I still think that this should be the default naming convention. There just seems to be some issues like no true enum support, not allowing configurations by inheritance (see one of my posts on MSDN) etc. I will save this for RTM though! Thanks :) –  TheCloudlessSky Dec 29 '10 at 20:08
    
No problem :) BTW, I couldn't find your thread about "configurations by inheritance" can you please provide me with the link? –  Morteza Manavi Dec 29 '10 at 21:33
    
    
Thanks for the link. BTW, I've started a series on Inheritance Mapping & EF Code First CTP5 which you might find useful: weblogs.asp.net/manavi/archive/2010/12/24/… –  Morteza Manavi Dec 30 '10 at 0:30

I cross posted this on the MSDN forums and I guess that this is, so far, by design. All navigational properties generate the type name + Id for the column name. To me this is a fundamental design flaw in code-first. The names generated don't even reflect the column (except that it's a User).

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No, it's not a design flaw, please read my answer :) –  Morteza Manavi Dec 29 '10 at 18:24

You can overrule the default column names using HasColumnName(...)

public class UserConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<User>
{
    public UserConfiguration()
    {
         this.HasKey(t => t.Id);

         this.HasOptional(u => u.CreatedBy);
         // Map the 'DateCreated' Property to the 'CreatedById' table field.
         this.Property(u => u.DateCreated).HasColumnName("CreatedById");

         this.Property(u => u.Name).HasMaxLength(64);
         this.Property(u => u.Username).HasMaxLength(64);
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Why would I map DateCreated to the Id of CreatedBy? That doesn't make any sense. HasColumnName is only available on non-navigational properties. –  TheCloudlessSky Dec 28 '10 at 16:28
    
Sorry about that. My mistake. Misread your question completely. –  Steven K. Dec 28 '10 at 17:10
    
No worries :). I was hoping to have the HasColumnName as well but if you take a look at the MSDN like in my post, you'll see that it's not even possible to control the navigational property names. –  TheCloudlessSky Dec 28 '10 at 21:00

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